Guided bone regeneration (GBR) has become a gold standard in bone regeneration for localized ridge augmentation either prior to or in conjunction with implant placement. It is a well-documented technique in the literature that ensures repeatable and clinically predictable outcomes.1–5  The GBR procedure involves the use of a space-maintaining scaffold in the form of a bone graft and blood clot, stabilized by a cell occlusive membrane. The membrane is pivotal in preventing ingression of epithelial or connective tissue cells into the recipient site. The membrane allows selective repopulation of the wound with osteoblasts, leading to bone regeneration.6–9  PASS principle, that is, primary closure, angiogenesis, space maintenance, and stability of the wound and implant, has to be meticulously followed to achieve bone regeneration using GBR.10  Stabilization of the membrane and the graft is extremely crucial for successful GBR and has been traditionally accomplished using...

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