The identification of unknown dental implants has posed a challenge for dentists and patients alike. If the dentist is not able to immediately recognize the implant system and patients do not have access to their dental records, subsequent treatment may have a sequela of events. For dentists, the implant identification process consumes time and, in some cases, multiple attempts. For patients, it not only requires extra time but may cause discomfort in obtaining the ideal radiographic image, plus increased risk of overexposure with multiple attempts to get an acceptable image. Incorrect implant components cannot be returned if opened, and ill-fitting implant parts may compromise the implant-restorative interface. Once the implant-restoration interface is damaged, further clinical complications with the definitive restoration may follow. As a result, when dental implants of unknown type are encountered, there is a risk of increased time and expense to both stakeholders.

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