My wife has long been bewildered by what she considers to be the juvenile behavior of the scientists she has known—relatives, friends, and, of course, husband. That husband, the psychoparasitologist, has attempted to explain to her that scientists have their emotional development arrested by a lifelong obsession and possession of playthings. Their toys accompany them into the adult estate, and like children they discard the toy of the moment when a new, more amusing one comes along. For a generation of parasitologists, beginning about 1950, the electron microscope was the instrument that was paramountly captivating. Malariologists found it particularly rewarding in elucidating the biological aracana of the Plasmodium. Then electron microscopy largely gave way to molecular/genetic studies with its new, attractively sophisticated instrumentation. This commentary considers the manifold contribution of electron microscopy to malariology as it stems from the seminal 1969 publication of Roger Ladda,...

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