Two new species of habronematid nematodes are described in birds from the Area de Conservacion Guanacaste, Costa Rica. Torquatoides trogoni n. sp., in Trogon massena, can be distinguished from T. torquata, T. bengalensis, and T. crotophaga in lacking lateral alae. Among species lacking lateral alae, the new species differs from T. balanocephala in having 14 versus 8–10 cephalic cuticular plaques, 21–22 versus 13–17 pairs of preanal papillae, and a beak-shaped versus U-shaped gubernaculum. The new species differs from T. singhi in body length, in having 21–22 versus 10 pairs of precloacal papillae, longer spicules, and larger eggs. The new species differs from T. crotophaga, the only other species known from Central America, in lacking lateral alae, and having 14 versus 6 cephalic cuticular plaques, 21–22 versus 17 pairs of precloacal and 3 versus 2 pairs of postcloacal papillae, and a gubernaculum. Excisa ramphastina n. sp., in Ramphastos sulfuratus, can be distinguished from E. excisa, E. biloba, E. buckleyi, E. dentifera, and E. khalili in having 1 lateral ala versus none, cervical papillae anterior versus posterior to the nerve ring, and asymmetrical caudal alae. Excisa ramphastina is similar to E. curvata in having cervical papillae anterior to the nerve ring but differs in having 1 lateral ala versus none, asymmetrical caudal alae, an average spicule ratio of 1:4.4 versus 1:3.3, and 4 versus 2 pairs of sessile papillae. The new species differs from E. columbi in having 1 versus 2 lateral alae, in the length of the spicules, in having a different spicule ratio, and in the numbers of sessile papillae.

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