The College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists (CPNP) membership has elected three officers to serve on the 2013–2015 Board of Directors. Assuming their offices effective July 1, 2013 will be President-Elect Dr. Steven Burghart, Treasurer Dr. Christopher Thomas, and Member-at-Large Dr. Raymond Love.

Steven Burghart, DPh, MBA, BCPP, currently serving his second term as Treasurer on the Board of Directors, has been a CPNP member since 2000 and served in a number of volunteer roles. Steve has practiced psychiatric pharmacy for more than 18 years and has been board certified in psychiatric pharmacy since 1999. In addition to his CPNP service, Steve serves as Chair of the Specialty Council on Psychiatric Pharmacy with the Board of Pharmacy Specialties. He is in his fifth year of service on the council and will conclude his term on the council in 2013. His current position is director of pharmacy at Rolling Hills (psychiatric) Hospital in Franklin, Tennessee. His academic appointments include previously serving as Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Kansas and currently as an affiliate faculty at Belmont and Lipscomb Colleges of Pharmacy in Nashville.

Christopher Thomas, PharmD, BCPP, BCPS, CGP, joined CPNP in 1999 as a pharmacy student. He has been actively involved in the organization in a variety of capacities and has served CPNP through leadership and collaboration. Chris works as a clinical pharmacy specialist with the Chillicothe Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) in Chillicothe Ohio. Most of his clinical practice has been devoted to serving inpatients in the Mental Health Care Line, which comprises over 100 beds. He also works in an outpatient clinic providing care to the severely mental ill patients enrolled with the Mental Health Intensive Care Management (MHICM) team. Chris has implemented PGY-1 and PGY-2 residencies at the Chillicothe VAMC and is currently the Residency Program Director for PGY-1 and PGY-2 Psychiatry Specialty. He is also a Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacology at Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Raymond Love, PharmD, BCPP, FASHP, is a founding member of CPNP and has a long history with CPNP and the promotion of psychiatric pharmacy practice. He was the 2010 recipient of the Saklad Memorial Award. Since beginning practice in 1977, Ray established the first ASHP accredited residency clinical residency at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, one of the first statewide clozapine monitoring programs, a statewide program to address antipsychotic use in children and the University's Mental Health Pharmacy Program which furnishes services to five state psychiatric hospitals and Maryland Medicaid. He served as a member of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy where he helped establish pharmacist delivered collaborative drug therapy management in Maryland. He currently directs the Mental Health Pharmacy Program which includes 30 pharmacists in psychiatric practice throughout Maryland. In addition, he also directs the Maryland Peer Review for Mental Health Drugs in Children and Adolescents Program, a cooperative program between Maryland Medicaid, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy and Department of Psychiatry and the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

You can submit abstracts online for the 2013 CPNP Annual Meeting from now through January 15, 2013. Accepted abstracts will be displayed at the poster session Monday, April 22 at the Broadmoor Hotel in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Presenting authors of accepted posters must be paid registrants for a minimum of the day of the poster session. The registration must be received by February 14, 2013, or the abstract will be administratively removed. The registration for the presenting author cannot be cancelled.

Abstracts may be submitted in one of five different categories:

  • Original Research Abstracts should describe original research in therapeutics, pharmacodynamics, pharmacoeconomics, outcomes, drug utilization, kinetics and genetics. Abstracts must not have been published in abstract form nor presented elsewhere before the CPNP 2012 Meeting.

  • Encore Presentation Abstracts that have been previously presented and peer reviewed. Submission must include where it was previously presented or the abstract will be disqualified. Encore submissions are not eligible for any of the award categories and should not be submitted for award consideration.

  • Work in Progress (WIP) Abstracts describing preliminary results or status of ongoing work may be submitted by principal investigators at any stage of their career. Abstracts submitted without results at the time of submission will be considered for this category only.

  • Innovative Practices Abstracts describing the development, justification, documentation, and/or delivery of innovative services or activities applicable to psychiatric and neurologic pharmacy. The descriptive abstract should not duplicate any other poster category and should describe the development of innovative services/activities and should provide background/rationale, a description of the innovative service, the impact on patient care/institution and a conclusion.

  • Therapeutic Case Report Abstracts describing the various aspects of pharmaceutical care relating to individual psychiatric and/or neurological pharmacy cases. Abstracts should provide a complete patient history including age, gender, time from first diagnosis, social background, and details of, and response to, previous and current treatment(s). Cases should include background, complete patient history, review of literature, and conclusion.

Abstracts may also be considered in one of five different award categories:

  • Research Trainee Award

  • New Investigator Award

  • Original Research

  • Innovative Practices Award

  • Therapeutic Case Report Award

Please note that for the Research Trainee category, Works in Progress are allowed, provided there is an interim data analysis and timetable for completion included in the abstract. Individuals who have completed a residency within the last 12 months are eligible for this award.

For more information, visit the abstract center online. It provides abstract examples, a database of prior years' abstracts, judging criteria, and other valuable resources as you prepare your abstract for submission. If you have any questions, please contact the CPNP office at [email protected].

Jerry McKee Pharm.D., M.S., BCPP1

1Associate Director of Behavioral Health Pharmacy Programs Community Care of North Carolina Raleigh, North Carolina

This Month's CPNP Volunteer

Jerry McKee is currently the CPNP Past President, and he dedicates approximately 20 hours to the organization each month. Below, he explains in his own words why he volunteers for CPNP.

How I Benefit from Volunteering with CPNP

Volunteering with CPNP is a great way to develop leadership skills and to initiate relationships with peers that will pay dividends to you both professionally and personally. The contacts and skills that you gain can, in the long run, make you a stronger, more efficient and more effective practitioner. Based upon my experience with CPNP, I can guarantee this to be true.

How CPNP Benefits from My Volunteering

CPNP depends upon member efforts to make the organization successful.

Why I recommend volunteering for CPNP

So once again, we find ourselves “at the crossroads” and as an organization, we must choose to lead, follow, or get out of the way. If we are indecisive, the future will be decided for us. CPNP has considered the question of “what's it going to take?” to get us where we want to go. Consistent with the Psychiatric Pharmacist Manifesto and the behavioral health integration white paper which have been crafted in the last year, it is the goal of CPNP to achieve pharmacist recognition as a clinical practitioner along with a reimbursement mechanism for comprehensive medication management services.

So in my opinion, the X factor in “what's it going to take” is member involvement. I promise that, based on my own experience, you will be amply and richly rewarded for jumping in the fray with us.

Every year, CPNP's Resident and New Practitioner Committee asks all Residency Program Directors who have a residency program listed on the CPNP Residency Directory, to complete a brief survey. The purpose of this survey is to gather information which will assist the committee and CPNP in:

  1. Increasing the visibility of postgraduate training in psychiatric/neurologic pharmacy.

  2. Increasing the number of psychiatric/neurologic pharmacy specialists completing postgraduate training.

  3. Increasing the involvement and participation of residency program directors, trainees, and new practitioners in CPNP.

Below is a brief summary of 2012 survey findings:

  • 37 programs with an 89% response rate, an increase from 2011.

  • Majority of programs offer 1 or more PGY2 psychiatric pharmacy slots and 6 programs offer a combined PGY1/PGY2 residency program.

  • Over 90% of programs are ASHP accredited or are seeking ASHP accreditation. The most common reasons for not obtaining ASHP accreditation include new programs not eligible for accreditation and/or financial concerns.

  • The VA or University teaching hospitals serve as the primary practice site for 62% of programs.

  • The majority of programs (91%) filled their residency slots last year. One quarter (25%) utilized ASHP's pre-commitment process and 27% participated in the post-match scramble.

  • The majority of programs offered a mixture of inpatient and outpatient settings (62%), followed by primarily inpatient programs (35.3%).

  • The majority of residents obtained positions upon completion of their residency program. The VA and Community Hospitals were the most common practice settings of positions obtained.

  • The attributes considered most valuable when hiring new employees included a PGY2 psychiatric pharmacy residency and BCPP or plans to obtain BCPP.

For the 2012 Residency Program Director Survey, 37 distinct residency program directors were contacted and 33 responded (89% response rate). From the results of the survey, the current types of programs include:

  • PGY-1 with emphasis in psychiatry: 6 positions

  • PGY-2: 37 positions, reflecting an increase of 7 positions since the 2011 survey results.

  • Of those completing the survey, there were no responses to MS or PhD program availability

Figure 1.

ASHP Accreditation Status

Figure 1.

ASHP Accreditation Status

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Of the RPDs that responded 75.8% intend to remain ASHP-accredited programs. Twenty-four percent (24%) wish to become an ASHP-accredited program. Reasons for not seeking ASHP accreditation included:

  • Our program is new. We plan to apply for accreditation on July 1st

  • Still determining whether this program will continue

  • Unclear if funding will continue

  • We are in candidate status now

The majority of programs offered a mixture of inpatient and outpatient settings (61.8%), followed by primarily inpatient programs (35.3%). No programs were primarily outpatient.

Figure 2.

Residency Practice Site

Figure 2.

Residency Practice Site

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For the 2012–2013 residency year, 91% of respondents filled their residency slots. ASHP's pre-commitment process to accept a PGY1 resident into the PGY2 program was utilized in 8 programs (25%). Nine programs (27.3%) participated in the post-match scramble.

The majority of residents were able to obtain positions after completing their residency program; and only 3 of 34 respondents reported residents were still looking for positions at the time of survey completion. The majority (64.7%) of residents obtained Psychiatric or Neurologic Clinical Specialist positions (Figure 3). The top 2 practice settings of positions obtained were in VA Hospitals (38.2%) and Community Hospitals (20.6%)

Figure 3.

Positions Obtained After Residency

Figure 3.

Positions Obtained After Residency

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Figure 4.

Practice Settings of Positions Obtained After Residency

Figure 4.

Practice Settings of Positions Obtained After Residency

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When asked if they were involved in the hiring of applicants for an inpatient/outpatient clinical practice position the following attributes were considered.

Figure 5.

Qualifications Sought When Hiring for Clinical Practice Position

Figure 5.

Qualifications Sought When Hiring for Clinical Practice Position

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Results were similar for hiring a clinical faculty member. Qualifications that the majority of respondents found most desirable were completion of a PGY2 Psychiatric Residency and BCPP or plan to obtain BCPP.