Clinical Relevance

Using the deep margin elevation technique in preparations extending beyond the cemento-enamel junction appears to be beneficial in maintaining structural integrity of CAD/CAM-fabricated feldspathic ceramic inlays.

SUMMARY

Objective:

To evaluate the effect of deep margin elevation on structural and marginal integrity of ceramic inlays.

Methods and Materials:

Forty extracted human third molars were collected and randomly separated into four groups (n=10/group). In group 1 (enamel margin group), the gingival margin was placed 1 mm supragingival to the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). In group 2 (cementum margin group), the gingival margin was placed 2 mm below the CEJ. In group 3 (glass ionomer [GI] margin group), the gingival margin was placed 2 mm below the CEJ, and then the margin elevated with GI to the CEJ. In group 4 (resin-modified glass ionomer [RMGI] margin group), the gingival margin was placed 2 mm below the CEJ, and then the margin elevated with RMGI to the CEJ. Standardized ceramic class II inlays were fabricated with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing and bonded to all teeth, and ceramic proximal box heights were measured. All teeth were subjected to 10,000 cycles of thermocycling (5°C/55°C) and then underwent 1,200,000 cycles of vertical chewing simulation at 50 N of force. Ceramic restorations and marginal integrity were assessed with a Hirox digital microscope. The Fisher exact test (two-tailed) with adjusted p-values (α=0.05) and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis.

Results:

The cementum margin group had a significantly higher ceramic fracture rate (90%) compared to other groups (10% in enamel margin and GI margin groups, p=0.007; 0% in RMGI group, p<0.001). Logistic regression showed that with increased ceramic proximal box heights, the probability of ceramic fracture increased dramatically.

Conclusion:

Deep marginal elevation resulted in decreased ceramic fracture when preparation margins were located below the CEJ. There was no difference found between margin elevation with GI or RMGI. Increased heights of ceramic proximal box may lead to an increased probability of ceramic fracture.

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