The relationship between intrinsic radiosensitivity and repair capacity was studied for 22 human tumor cell lines in vitro. The experimental material was taken from 19 published papers. Parameters from three radiobiological models were used to assess this relationship: the one-hit multitarget model (D0 and n), the linear-quadratic model (α and β), and the mean inactivation dose (D̄). Data were obtained for cells in three stages: exponentially growing cells (exp), plateau-phase cells plated immediately after irradiation (ip), and plateau-phase cells plated after completion of PLD repair (dp). No significant difference was found between radiosensitivity of exp and ip cells. There was no correlation between repair capacity and intrinsic radiosensitivity assessed with plateau-phase cells plated immediately after irradiation. The correlation studies between intrinsic radiosensitivity or repair capacity and clinical responsiveness were achieved by assigning cell lines to one of three groups of decreasing in vivo radioresponsiveness: highly, medium, and poorly responsive. There was a significant correlation between radiosensitivity and radioresponsiveness, but no correlation between repair capacity and radioresponsiveness. The average repair capacity was about 0.6 Gy, in terms of D̄. Three parameters, the mean inactivation dose of exponentially growing cells, of plateau-phase cells plated immediately after irradiation, and of plateau-phase cells plated after completion of PLD repair, could be used equally to assess the relationship between in vitro data and radioresponsiveness. The present results are compared to those obtained in a similar study on a group of 48 nontransformed fibroblast cell strains.

This content is only available as a PDF.
You do not currently have access to this content.