Waldo Cohn, the biochemist who introduced ion-exchange chromatography into biochemistry, died on August 27 at the age of 89 in Oak Ridge, TN. Cohn began his career at the University of California in Berkeley, from which he received a Ph.D. in 1938. For his thesis, he used 32P, generated in the Berkeley cyclotron, to trace the metabolism of phosphorus in rats. He continued this research at the Harvard Medical School, beginning in 1939. In 1942, he was recruited by the Manhattan Project in Chicago to study the metabolism of fission products; this led him to ion-exchange chromatography as a technique for separating and characterizing the many nuclides that constitute the fission products.

Cohn moved from the Chicago Metallurgical Laboratory to Clinton Laboratory (now Oak Ridge National Laboratory) in 1943. Clinton, with its newly built megawatt reactor, was an abundant source of fission products for Cohn's...

You do not currently have access to this content.