Long-eared Owls (Asio otus) frequently inhabit human-altered landscapes, including residential areas in cities, where they usually breed in nests of corvids, and roost communally on trees during the autumn and winter (Pirovano et al. 2000, König and Weick 2008). Winter roosting sites are often located in urban/suburban areas (Makarova and Sharikov 2015) and can hold several hundred individuals (up to approximately 400 individuals; Ružić et al. 2009). Although Long-eared Owls have widely varying diets, they are considered specialist predators that prey primarily on small mammals (e.g., Microtus voles, Apodemus mice). Most studies conducted in Europe have concluded that small mammals are the most important prey of this species (Nilsson 1981, Escala et al. 2009, Dziemian et al. 2012) and can make up to 93% of the prey consumed (Birrer...

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