Christopher G. Robertson

Guest Editor

Christopher G. Robertson

Guest Editor

I am pleased to introduce this special Frontiers issue of Rubber Chemistry and Technology, which was created to highlight cutting-edge research on breakthrough materials, novel approaches to modeling and testing, and exciting new applications in the field of elastomers.

This year marks the 90th anniversary of Rubber Chemistry and Technology. This journal has a storied history as the preeminent peer-reviewed journal in the field of rubber science with a balanced scope that is relevant to academic and industrial research activities alike. Key scientific contributions throughout the years include more than 50 publications by Nobel Laureates in polymer chemistry, Paul Flory, Giulio Natta, Karl Ziegler, and Hermann Staudinger.

Rubber Chemistry and Technology also has an important and exciting present and future as the reporting outlet for new discoveries at the forefront of elastomer science and technology. The rich physics and chemistry for rubbery substances and their composites, along with the extensive range of their commercial uses, are unmatched by other types of materials. The behavior of rubber is a major component of the rapidly expanding domain of soft matter physics, which also explains the increase in scientific inquiry and publishing activity in this area. This special issue was made necessary by the rapid pace of new developments in the field and the impact of rubbery materials across many other disciplines.

Topics covered in this Frontiers collection of articles include new insights into the influence of nanoscale fillers on polymer dynamics and reinforcement from both molecular dynamics and experimental investigations. Novel testing methodologies and theoretical frameworks are offered in rubber characterization and failure mechanics. Dielectric elastomers, bio-based polymers, graphene nanocomposites, and other innovative materials and applications are also represented by the research published herein. The authors are affiliated with academia, government laboratories, and industry in the United States, Europe, and Asia, reflecting the global nature and breadth of research and development in the field.

On behalf of the Editorial Board, I hope you enjoy this inaugural Frontiers issue.