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Relationships between the abundance of dingoes and their major prey species suggest that dingoes have a functional role in ecosystems. Thus, both the dingo and its function need to be conserved. If dingo hybrids are functionally similar to dingoes, they may need to be maintained in areas where there are no pure dingoes. There is little evidence to support the widely-held belief that dingoes or other wild dogs limit the distribution or abundance of foxes in NSW.

In 1995-96, dingoes and other wild dogs occurred in 133 of NPWS national parks and nature reserves (2.32 million ha), most of which are east of the Great Dividing Range. NPWS has the responsibility of conserving remaining dingo populations on these parks and reserves. However, it also recognises that dingoes and other wild dogs may affect livestock on adjoining properties and accepts the need for management to minimise attacks on stock. The NPWS policy for the management of wild dogs (including dingoes) balances these conflicting aims. Where it is necessary to protect livestock on adjoining properties, NPWS carries out both strategic and reactive control of wild dogs. In 1995-96, control was necessary on 57 (43%) of the parks and reserves with wild dogs. The majority (83%) of this control was in cooperation with adjoining landholders. The most common method was ground baiting with 1080, followed by aerial baiting, trapping, shooting and barrier fencing. Most ground baits are now deployed in bait mounds to minimise non-target take. Since 1995-96, aerial baiting has been significantly reduced; in 1998 it occurred on only two reserves. NPWS policy and practices of wild dog management will respond to increasing knowledge about dingoes and other wild dogs, and to proposed changes to the Rural Lands Protection Act 1989, in a manner consistent with both its conservation responsibilities and the need to protect the livestock of neighbours.

Catling, P. C. and Burt, R. J. 1995. Why are red foxes absent from some eucalypt forests in eastern New South Wales? Wildlife Research 22, 535-546.
Eason, C. T., Wickstrom, M. L. and Spurrs, E. B. 1998. Review of impacts of large-scale sodium monofluroacetate (1080) use in New Zealand. In Proceedings of the 11th Australian Vertebrate Pest Control Conference, 105-110.
Fleming, P. J. S. 1996. Ground-placed baits for the control of wild dogs: evaluation of a replacement-baiting strategy in north-eastern New South Wales. Wildlife Research 23, 729-740.
Fleming, P. J. S. and Parker, R. W. 1991. Temporal decline of 1080 within meat baits used for wild dog control in New South Wales. Wildlife Research 18, 729-740.
Harden, R. 1997. A survey of vertebrate pests in the Service estate. Unpublished report to NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service, Hurstville. (Pp 1-25).
Harden, R. H. and Robertshaw, J. D. 1987. The ecology of the dingo in north-eastern New South Wales. V. Human predation on the dingo. Australian Zoologist 24, 65-72.
Jarman, P. 1986. The red fox—an exotic, large predator. In The Ecology of Exotic animals and Plants: some Australian Case Histories. (Ed. Kitching, R. L.) pp. 43-61. Wiley: Brisbane.
McIlroy, J. C., Cooper, R. J., Gifford, E. J., Green, B. F. and Newgrain, K. W. 1986. The effect on wild dogs, Canis f. familiaris, of 1080 poisoning campaigns in Koscuisko National Park, New South Wales. Australian Wildlife Research 13, 535-544.
McIlroy, J. C., Gifford, E. J. and Carpenter, S. M. 1988. The effect of rainfall and blowfly larvae on the toxicity of 1080-treated meat baits used in poisoning campaigns against wild dogs. Australian Wildlife Research 15, 473-483.
Newsome, A. E. 2001. The Zoology and ecology of the Dingo pp. 20-33 in A Symposium on the Dingo ed. by C R. Dickman and D. Lunney. Royal Zoological Society of N. S. W. Mosman.
Newsome, A. E., Corbett, L. K., Catling, P. C. and Burt, R. J. 1983. The feeding ecology of the dingo. I. Stomach contents from trapping in south-eastern Australia, and non-target wildlife also caught in dingo traps. Australian Wildlife Research 10, 477-486.
Robertshaw, J. D. and Harden, R. H. 1985a. Ecology of the dingo in north-eastern New South Wales. II. Diet. Australian Wildlife Research 12, 39-50.
Robertshaw, J. D. and Harden, R. H. 1985b. Ecology of the dingo in north-eastern New South Wales. III. Analysis of macropod bone fragment in dingo scats. Australian Wildlife Research 12, 163-171.
Robertshaw, J. D. and Harden, R. H. 1986. Ecology of the dingo in north-eastern New South Wales. IV. Prey selection by dingoes and its effect on the major prey species, the swamp wallaby ( Wallabia bicolor Desmarest). Australian Wildlife Research 13, 141-163.
Saunders, G., Coman, B., Kinnear, J. and Braysher, M. 1995 Managing Vertebrate Pests: Foxes. Bureau of Resource Sciences, Australian Government Publishing Service: Canberra.
Triggs, B., Brunner, H. and Cullen, J. M. 1984. The food of the fox, dog and cat in Croajingalong National Park, south-eastern Victoria. Australian Wildlife Research 11, 491-499.
Wilton, A. (2001). DNA methods of assessing Dingo purity. pp 49-56 in A Symposium on the Dingo ed. by C R. Dickman and D. Lunney. Royal Zoological Society of N. S. W. Mosman.
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References

Catling, P. C. and Burt, R. J. 1995. Why are red foxes absent from some eucalypt forests in eastern New South Wales? Wildlife Research 22, 535-546.
Eason, C. T., Wickstrom, M. L. and Spurrs, E. B. 1998. Review of impacts of large-scale sodium monofluroacetate (1080) use in New Zealand. In Proceedings of the 11th Australian Vertebrate Pest Control Conference, 105-110.
Fleming, P. J. S. 1996. Ground-placed baits for the control of wild dogs: evaluation of a replacement-baiting strategy in north-eastern New South Wales. Wildlife Research 23, 729-740.
Fleming, P. J. S. and Parker, R. W. 1991. Temporal decline of 1080 within meat baits used for wild dog control in New South Wales. Wildlife Research 18, 729-740.
Harden, R. 1997. A survey of vertebrate pests in the Service estate. Unpublished report to NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service, Hurstville. (Pp 1-25).
Harden, R. H. and Robertshaw, J. D. 1987. The ecology of the dingo in north-eastern New South Wales. V. Human predation on the dingo. Australian Zoologist 24, 65-72.
Jarman, P. 1986. The red fox—an exotic, large predator. In The Ecology of Exotic animals and Plants: some Australian Case Histories. (Ed. Kitching, R. L.) pp. 43-61. Wiley: Brisbane.
McIlroy, J. C., Cooper, R. J., Gifford, E. J., Green, B. F. and Newgrain, K. W. 1986. The effect on wild dogs, Canis f. familiaris, of 1080 poisoning campaigns in Koscuisko National Park, New South Wales. Australian Wildlife Research 13, 535-544.
McIlroy, J. C., Gifford, E. J. and Carpenter, S. M. 1988. The effect of rainfall and blowfly larvae on the toxicity of 1080-treated meat baits used in poisoning campaigns against wild dogs. Australian Wildlife Research 15, 473-483.
Newsome, A. E. 2001. The Zoology and ecology of the Dingo pp. 20-33 in A Symposium on the Dingo ed. by C R. Dickman and D. Lunney. Royal Zoological Society of N. S. W. Mosman.
Newsome, A. E., Corbett, L. K., Catling, P. C. and Burt, R. J. 1983. The feeding ecology of the dingo. I. Stomach contents from trapping in south-eastern Australia, and non-target wildlife also caught in dingo traps. Australian Wildlife Research 10, 477-486.
Robertshaw, J. D. and Harden, R. H. 1985a. Ecology of the dingo in north-eastern New South Wales. II. Diet. Australian Wildlife Research 12, 39-50.
Robertshaw, J. D. and Harden, R. H. 1985b. Ecology of the dingo in north-eastern New South Wales. III. Analysis of macropod bone fragment in dingo scats. Australian Wildlife Research 12, 163-171.
Robertshaw, J. D. and Harden, R. H. 1986. Ecology of the dingo in north-eastern New South Wales. IV. Prey selection by dingoes and its effect on the major prey species, the swamp wallaby ( Wallabia bicolor Desmarest). Australian Wildlife Research 13, 141-163.
Saunders, G., Coman, B., Kinnear, J. and Braysher, M. 1995 Managing Vertebrate Pests: Foxes. Bureau of Resource Sciences, Australian Government Publishing Service: Canberra.
Triggs, B., Brunner, H. and Cullen, J. M. 1984. The food of the fox, dog and cat in Croajingalong National Park, south-eastern Victoria. Australian Wildlife Research 11, 491-499.
Wilton, A. (2001). DNA methods of assessing Dingo purity. pp 49-56 in A Symposium on the Dingo ed. by C R. Dickman and D. Lunney. Royal Zoological Society of N. S. W. Mosman.
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