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World Wide Fund for Nature asks the question, “Is science demonstrating leadership for conservation?” It is our view that science is not, and that is unfortunate since scientists, especially naturalists, were vital to the development of the very concept of conservation. We are concerned that the role of Australian scientists in conservation has dwindled to the point that the community is demanding answers and information and few scientists take the challenge of finding the solutions. In fact the community is now teaming up with government and finding answers, answers that aren't necessarily the most appropriate solutions.

The Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales is well placed to show leadership for conservation and to encourage its members to ensure that their work is relevant to conservation and is not passed over or ignored in the decision making process.

Forster, P. I., Bostock, P. D., Bird, L. H. and Bean, A. R. (eds), 1991 Vineforest Plant Atlas for South-East Queensland with Assessment of Conservation Status. Queensland Herbarium, Indooroopilly.
Lunney, D., Hand, S., Reed, P. and Butcher, D. (eds), 1994 Future of the Fauna of Western New South Wales. Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, Mosman.
Ross, J. 1999 Guide to Best Practice Conservation of Temperate Native Grasslands. World Wide Fund for Nature, Sydney.
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References

Forster, P. I., Bostock, P. D., Bird, L. H. and Bean, A. R. (eds), 1991 Vineforest Plant Atlas for South-East Queensland with Assessment of Conservation Status. Queensland Herbarium, Indooroopilly.
Lunney, D., Hand, S., Reed, P. and Butcher, D. (eds), 1994 Future of the Fauna of Western New South Wales. Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, Mosman.
Ross, J. 1999 Guide to Best Practice Conservation of Temperate Native Grasslands. World Wide Fund for Nature, Sydney.
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