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Invasive animals include introduced and native animals that have or may become overabundant and pose threats to agriculture, the environment or human health and safety. Following its successful bid to the Australian Government's Cooperative Research Centres Program, a new Invasive Animals CRC commenced its operations in 2006 specifically to deal with these threats. The IA CRC will focus on helping to solve invasive animal (vertebrate) pest problems through the development of commercial outputs, integrated strategies and business partnerships that bring together national and international skills in science, management, commerce and industry. Comprising a large number of members (41), the IA CRC will assemble critical mass to address an Australasian problem and it will bring together private and public land managers to integrate approaches to invasive animal management. This unique partnership will deliver the means to deal with existing high profile invasive animal pests as well as those that have the potential to cause catastrophic impacts in the future. Outcomes will help solve the prominent and costly impacts of invasive species on agricultural, environmental and social values.

Agtrans Research, 2005. A review of progress on invasive species: a report to the Department of Environment and Heritage, Canberra.
Bomford, M., and Hart, Q., 2005. ‘Non-Indigenous Vertebrates in Australia’ in Biological Invasions: Economic and Environmental Cost of Alien Plant, Animal and Microbe Species, D Pimental (ed) CRC press, London.
IUCN. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. A Global Species Assessment. J.E.M., Hilton-Taylor, C. and Stuart, S.N. (Editors). IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK
Lintermans, M., 2004. Human-assisted dispersal of alien freshwater fish in Australia. New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research, 38: 481-501.
McLeod, R., 2004. Counting the Cost: Impact of Invasive Animals in Australia 2004: a report to the Cooperative Research Centre for Pest Animal Control, Canberra.
Rolls, E.C., 1969. They all ran wild: the story of pests of the land in Australia. Angus and Robertson, Sydney.
Short, J., and Smith, A., 1994. Mammal decline and recovery in Australia. Journal of Mammalogy, 75(2): 288-297.
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References

Agtrans Research, 2005. A review of progress on invasive species: a report to the Department of Environment and Heritage, Canberra.
Bomford, M., and Hart, Q., 2005. ‘Non-Indigenous Vertebrates in Australia’ in Biological Invasions: Economic and Environmental Cost of Alien Plant, Animal and Microbe Species, D Pimental (ed) CRC press, London.
IUCN. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. A Global Species Assessment. J.E.M., Hilton-Taylor, C. and Stuart, S.N. (Editors). IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK
Lintermans, M., 2004. Human-assisted dispersal of alien freshwater fish in Australia. New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research, 38: 481-501.
McLeod, R., 2004. Counting the Cost: Impact of Invasive Animals in Australia 2004: a report to the Cooperative Research Centre for Pest Animal Control, Canberra.
Rolls, E.C., 1969. They all ran wild: the story of pests of the land in Australia. Angus and Robertson, Sydney.
Short, J., and Smith, A., 1994. Mammal decline and recovery in Australia. Journal of Mammalogy, 75(2): 288-297.
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