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Wildlife management is, in our view, as much about education, and managing people's attitudes, as it is about the science of populations of animals. The successful koala management program for Victoria, outlined by Peter Menkhorst, has only been possible because of his firm grasp, and that of his colleagues, of the divergent attitudes towards koalas. Among the many benefits provided to humans by the wildlife resource, we have tackled just one value in this book - recreational. Wildlife can also cause problems for people. Among the negative values of wildlife, we selected but one topic, namely roadkill. The plenary sessions to this forum were filled with interesting details and some provocative challenges, such as that by Des Cooper, “…this discussion is really being conducted with a particular set of assumptions, which are assumptions made by rich, well-to-do people who live in cities…” We need much more of such cut-and-thrust to avoid the narrow viewpoint that is possible from the comfort of mid-city life. On the other hand, do we really think that those in immediate contact with a wildlife problem are always the best informed to manage our wildlife? Arthur White delicately touched a subject that shows just how fast matters are changing. He entitled his paper, “Can I touch that frog?” He asked, “With limited exposure to the natural world will future generations still be prepared to defend global ecosystems?” From the gentle approach of whale-watching and the attention to seals and dolphins, and the careful research that underpinned all the recommendations, to the as yet nearly-impenetrable problem of roadkill, the issue that is central is that of communication. We are not isolated in Australia from world problems, but the converse also applies - our solutions and our communication endeavours can make an international contribution. Harry Recher posed the question in his foreword: “How do you make people care and therefore willing to share with others, and other species?” The authors in this book have made a positive contribution to seeking answers to that question.

Archer, M. 2002. Confronting crises in conservation: a talk on the wild side. Pp 12-52 in A Zoological Revolution. Using native fauna to assist in its own survival, edited by D. Lunney and C. Dickman. Royal Zoological Society of NSW, Mosman, NSW, and Australian Museum, Sydney.
Archer, M. and Beale, B. 2004 Going Native. Living in the Australian environment. Hodder Headline, Sydney.
Braithwaite, R. W. and Reynolds, P. C. 2002. Wildlife and Tourism. Pp 108-15 in A Zoological Revolution. Using native fauna to assist in its own survival, edited by D. Lunney and C. Dickman. Royal Zoological Society of NSW, Mosman, NSW, Australia.
Conover, M.R. 2002 Resolving human-wildlife conflicts: the science of wildlife management. Lewis Publishers, Boca Raton, Florida, USA.
Corbett, J. B. 2006 Communicating Nature. How we create and understand environmental messages. Island Press, Washington DC, USA.
Grigg, G. 2002. Conservation benefit from harvesting kangaroos: status report at the start of a new millennium. A paper to stimulate discussion and research. Pp 53-76 in A Zoological Revolution. Using native fauna to assist in its own survival, edited by D. Lunney and C. Dickman. Royal Zoological Society of NSW, Mosman, NSW, Australia.
Howard, P. and Jones, D. N. 2004. A qualitative study of wildlife feeding in south-east Queensland. Pp 55-62 in Urban Wildlife: more than meets the eye, edited by D. Lunney and S. Burgin. Royal Zoological Society of NSW, Mosman, NSW, Australia.
Lindenmayer, D. B. 2007 On Borrowed Time. Australia's environmental crisis and what we must do about it. CSIRO publishing, Collingwood, Victoria, Australia.
Lunney, D. and Ayers, D. 1993. The official status of frogs and reptiles in New South Wales. Pp 404-8 in Herpetology in Australia: a diverse discipline, edited by D. Lunney and D. Ayers. Royal Zoological Society of NSW, Mosman, NSW, Australia.
Lunney, D., Curtin, A. L., Ayers, D., Cogger, H. G., Dickman, C. R., Maitz, W., Law, B. and Fisher, D. 2000. The threatened and non-threatened native vertebrate fauna of New South Wales: status and ecological attributes. Environmental and Heritage Monograph Series No. 4. National Parks and Wildlife Service, Hurstville, NSW.
Lunney, D., Eby, P., Hutchings, P and Burgin, S. 2007. Pest or guest: the cultural context of the zoology of overabundance. Pp 258-69 in Pest or Guest: the zoology of overabundance, edited by D. Lunney, P. Eby, P. Hutchings and S. Burgin. Royal Zoological Society of NSW, Mosman, NSW, Australia.
Stratford, E., Mazur, N., Lunney, D. and Bennett, D. 2000. Managing the koala problem: interdisciplinary perspectives. Conservation Biology 14: 610-18.
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References

Archer, M. 2002. Confronting crises in conservation: a talk on the wild side. Pp 12-52 in A Zoological Revolution. Using native fauna to assist in its own survival, edited by D. Lunney and C. Dickman. Royal Zoological Society of NSW, Mosman, NSW, and Australian Museum, Sydney.
Archer, M. and Beale, B. 2004 Going Native. Living in the Australian environment. Hodder Headline, Sydney.
Braithwaite, R. W. and Reynolds, P. C. 2002. Wildlife and Tourism. Pp 108-15 in A Zoological Revolution. Using native fauna to assist in its own survival, edited by D. Lunney and C. Dickman. Royal Zoological Society of NSW, Mosman, NSW, Australia.
Conover, M.R. 2002 Resolving human-wildlife conflicts: the science of wildlife management. Lewis Publishers, Boca Raton, Florida, USA.
Corbett, J. B. 2006 Communicating Nature. How we create and understand environmental messages. Island Press, Washington DC, USA.
Grigg, G. 2002. Conservation benefit from harvesting kangaroos: status report at the start of a new millennium. A paper to stimulate discussion and research. Pp 53-76 in A Zoological Revolution. Using native fauna to assist in its own survival, edited by D. Lunney and C. Dickman. Royal Zoological Society of NSW, Mosman, NSW, Australia.
Howard, P. and Jones, D. N. 2004. A qualitative study of wildlife feeding in south-east Queensland. Pp 55-62 in Urban Wildlife: more than meets the eye, edited by D. Lunney and S. Burgin. Royal Zoological Society of NSW, Mosman, NSW, Australia.
Lindenmayer, D. B. 2007 On Borrowed Time. Australia's environmental crisis and what we must do about it. CSIRO publishing, Collingwood, Victoria, Australia.
Lunney, D. and Ayers, D. 1993. The official status of frogs and reptiles in New South Wales. Pp 404-8 in Herpetology in Australia: a diverse discipline, edited by D. Lunney and D. Ayers. Royal Zoological Society of NSW, Mosman, NSW, Australia.
Lunney, D., Curtin, A. L., Ayers, D., Cogger, H. G., Dickman, C. R., Maitz, W., Law, B. and Fisher, D. 2000. The threatened and non-threatened native vertebrate fauna of New South Wales: status and ecological attributes. Environmental and Heritage Monograph Series No. 4. National Parks and Wildlife Service, Hurstville, NSW.
Lunney, D., Eby, P., Hutchings, P and Burgin, S. 2007. Pest or guest: the cultural context of the zoology of overabundance. Pp 258-69 in Pest or Guest: the zoology of overabundance, edited by D. Lunney, P. Eby, P. Hutchings and S. Burgin. Royal Zoological Society of NSW, Mosman, NSW, Australia.
Stratford, E., Mazur, N., Lunney, D. and Bennett, D. 2000. Managing the koala problem: interdisciplinary perspectives. Conservation Biology 14: 610-18.
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