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Aboriginal people

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Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2010
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2010.004
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-3-6
... The images and written descriptions of the late 18th century European colonists and visitors to Port Jackson portray fishing as a common and important subsistence activity of the Aboriginal people who inhabited coastal Sydney. Both men and women fished, but there was a gendered dichotomy in the...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 39 (1): 76–80.
Published: 01 December 2017
...Heather Goodall ABSTRACT This paper argues that it was environmental knowledge, which Aboriginal people held and traded, that formed the basis of the slender chances they had for survival in the changed circumstances of British settlement in Sydney. The case study is centred on the life and work of...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 788–809.
Published: 20 October 2011
...Adam Smith At the time of European settlement, the wetlands of the Clarence River floodplain sustained considerably higher numbers of waterbirds than at present. These wetlands were valuable natural resources for the local Aboriginal people with ducks, geese and swans easily hunted using...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2007.038
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-0-5
..., the Dreaming track system can be seen as a social and economic institution which provided an adequate supply of resources for Aboriginal people and was an alternative for the adoption of horticulture in Australia. ...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (4): 436–445.
Published: 17 March 2014
... culture is only beginning to be realised by the researchers. Traditional ecological knowledge illustrates how Aboriginal people have learned to survive and live in their environment, but the gradual loss of such knowledge (especially with the death of senior men and elders) and the devastation of...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020)
Published: 16 October 2020
..., inland lakes. They guided people safely across hundreds of kilometers of desert, locating the places where water sources reach up closest to the earth’s surface from the underground lakes and waterways that flow beneath the continent. The dingo’s status in Aboriginal culture is celebrated in the naming...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (4): 656–662.
Published: 01 June 2020
... Chapter 1 provides an overview of the river from such things cost money to generate and to reproduce, the dual perspectives of how it provided a home and the price of the book would have had to be for Aboriginal people for millennia and how it was increased had my suggested maps been included. The...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (4): 518–536.
Published: 01 September 2017
... continent since the arrival of Aboriginal Australians at least 60,000 years ago (Roberts et al. 1994; Malaspinas et al. 2016). At the time of European settlement, South Gippsland was home to the Brataualung clan of the Gunaikurnai people (Figure 2) (Fison and Howitt 1880; Gunaikurnai Traditional Owner Land...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1993.015
EISBN: 0-9599951-8-8
... processes influencing the distributions of species or on the impact of threatening agents. Many regions have been subject to little or no herpetological survey. The conservation status of many taxa is unclear. The detailed knowledge about herpetofauna possessed by Aboriginal people has only recently been...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020)
Published: 27 October 2020
.... Dingoes attack livestock. This is the reality. Livestock predation has impacts that extend far beyond the animals that are attacked. It affects people. The basic tools for controlling dingoes are simple, traps, guns, fences and poison. Dingo control fails when these tools are not applied correctly, or one...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021)
Published: 02 February 2021
... scenes. In this article, the successful management of such interactions is described through six key lessons learnt from over 20 years of adaptive management and its evolution into the current Fraser Island Dingo Conservation and Risk Management Strategy . These are (1) focus on people first, (2...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021) 41 (2): fmi–fmcliv.
Published: 09 April 2021
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021)
Published: 24 February 2021
... Our knowledge about the origins of dingoes has been shaped by anthropology, archaeology, morphology and genetics. Anthropology indicates that dingoes have coexisted with humans in Australia for thousands of years, with dingoes featuring heavily in rock art and oral history kept by the First people of...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (2): 231–240.
Published: 11 November 2020
...-bust systems for wildlife and the resources they utilise (Kingsford et al. 1999). A review of the environmental history of weather and wildlife patterns in arid Australia identified that during the last 150 years the shift from Aboriginal land management to pastoral tenures, instigated changes in fire...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 124–138.
Published: 01 October 2020
... separating and Red Bloodwoods C. gummifera (Parry-Jones 1985; the camp from residential and commercial properties, Eby 1990; Law and Chidel 2008). Until recently, these which provides a buffer between flying-foxes and people, influxes only inundated camps away from developed areas reducing potential impacts...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020)
Published: 29 July 2020
... domestic dog populations (Sparkes et al. 2016). The dingo has become an iconic species for the general public, and has cultural importance to Aboriginal people. This native canid is valued by numerous stakeholders within the public, tourism, health and environmental sectors, but it is also considered a...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020)
Published: 14 July 2020
... minds of many Australian livestock graziers and they have cultural significance for many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples (Smith and Litchfield 2009), but we have little understanding of where they sit in the eyes of the broader Australian public. One factor that may influence public...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (4): 605–627.
Published: 01 June 2020
... in the rescue and rehabilitation of sick and injured wildlife (OEH 2019a). These volunteers represent about a third of people involved in this activity across Australia (Englefield et al. 2018). Volunteers are dispersed across the state and mostly belong to one of 31 groups of between 10 and over...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (3): 464–476.
Published: 01 June 2017
..., Prey, Plants and People Project, School of Environmental and Rural Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia. 2Vertebrate Pest Research Unit, Biosecurity NSW, NSW Department of Primary Industries, Orange Agricultural Institute, Forest Road Orange, NSW 2800, Australia. 3...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (3): 438–448.
Published: 01 May 2020
... citizens to participate, and the reasons behind people losing motivation to participate, we aim to improve the TurtleSAT system as well as inform others using a similar platform to tackle declining participation. Methods The citizen science project TurtleSAT (httpwww. turtlesat.org. au) was launched in May...