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Adaptable Bat

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Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.008
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... strong evidence. An opposing view, here termed the Adaptable Bat syndrome, emerged in the 1980's. Rather than being of conservation concern, bats were portrayed as resilient, adaptable ecological generalists that could not “reasonably” be considered at risk from human impacts. The Adaptable Bat is an...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 42–53.
Published: 01 October 2020
...; Chiroptera): wing adaptations, flight performance, foraging strategy and Holz, P. H., Lumsden, L. F., Marenda, M. S., Browning, G. echolocation. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 316: 335-427. F., and Hufschmid, J. (2018c). Two subspecies of bent-winged bats (Miniopterus orianae bassanii and oceanensis) in...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 658–668.
Published: 01 December 2018
... climate extremes on survival and so our data here provides strong support for the importance of refugia as a key action for adapting to climate change. Conclusions There is a number of lessons to learn from our long- term research. First, improved technology has led to major advances in the study of bats...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.038
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
...; therefore, bats (Microchiroptera) adapted to foraging along edges and in open spaces are likely to be less active in regrowth forest. Thinning is an integral component of regrowth management and could reduce structural clutter to a level suitable for bats with a range of clutter tolerances; yet little is...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 166–174.
Published: 17 March 2014
... semi-arid adapted bats, N. timoriensis and l! bauerstocki, adding support to the rarity of the former (Lumsden 1994) and the preference of the latter for drier, open woodlands (Lumsden and Bennett 1995). The presence of mesic-adapted species, such as N. gouldi and V r e p l u s , indicates the...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (3): 329.
Published: 17 March 2014
..., P. D., 1983. Little Bent-wing Bat Miniopterus australis. Pp. 338-39 in Complete book of Australian mammals ed by R. Strahan. Angus and Robertson: Sydney. Complete book of Australian mammals 338 39 Hall, L. S. and Richards, G. C., 1979. Bats of Eastern Australia. Queensland Museum Booklet...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (4): 467–479.
Published: 17 March 2014
... (Parnaby 1992; Lumsden and Menkborst 1995a) - the period of this survey. Only one arid-adapted species (S. bahtoni) was recorded in our survey and only a single individual was caught. We did not record the southern freetail bat M. planiceps (short penis), although it is known from River Red Gum forest near...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (3): 458–467.
Published: 17 March 2014
...Alex Kutt; Martin Schulz The flute-nosed bat Murina florium is a poorly known species that was first discovered in Australia at Mt Baldy State Forest on the Atherton Tablelands in north-eastern Queensland in 198 1. Subsequently there have been few other documented records despite intensive harp...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (2): 298–315.
Published: 17 March 2014
... issues involving the transmission, or possibility of transmission, of serious viral diseases by these large bats. Such issues require informed public discussion. It is the joint responsibility of science/medical professionals and journalists to ensure that such discussion occurs. Australian Bat...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.029
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... Bats in suburban areas face a number of challenges adapting to what is a highly altered landscape. This is particularly true for species that prefer tree hollows for day roosts because the large, old trees that have developed suitable hollows are often removed from suburban areas. In suburban...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.010
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... microchiropterans exhibit adaptations for specialist trawling foraging behaviours. Approximately half of these species are relatively well represented in the literature. Amongst these, the Large-footed Myotis, Myotis macropus , exhibits typical trawling bat behaviour; spending the majority (~88%) of foraging time...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2013) 36 (3): 355–363.
Published: 04 June 2013
... first published study to investigate roost use by M. norfolkensis and whilst we planned to have a greater sample sizes, we were only able to capture seven individuals and track six of them for a very short period. Our study confirms the difficultly of capturing rare open-adapted insectivorous bats, even...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2012) 36 (1): 1–4.
Published: 07 September 2012
... of lower bat activity in up-slope areas within harvested areas suggests that the regenerating forest after clear fell may not provide suitable foraging and / or commuting habitat for bats in the short term, although it is likely that some species would be better- adapted to such areas than others...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 341–348.
Published: 14 October 2011
... non-flying bats from a captive colony that were relocated to a large cage and trained to fly. Bone formation was followed over a seven-month period using fluorochrome labelling. We tested the hypothesis that there would be an adaptive, anabolic response of wing bones when they were exposed to elevated...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (4): 405–411.
Published: 17 March 2014
... call parameters, based on international microchiropteran literature, was adapted for Anabat use. The proposed terminologies were used, with the measurement of chosen parameters of selected recordings, to describe some of the call characteristics of seventeen species of microchiropteran bats occurring...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021)
Published: 07 July 2021
... drone characteristics downdrafts (Chabot and Bird 2012; Sardà-Palomera et al. or how drones are flown, were classed as controllable 2012). In particular, sharing airspace between aircraft and factors . Factors relating to external variables not volant wildlife such as birds and bats has a long history...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021) 41 (2): fmi–fmcliv.
Published: 09 April 2021
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021)
Published: 02 February 2021
.... 2018). Our observations involve very large centipedes, which have diverse diets, including massive prey items such as snakes (Chiacchio et al. 2017), lizards (Emery et al. 2020) and bats (Molinari et al. 2005). Such large prey may only be taken occasionally, but nonetheless may be a significant source...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (3): 379–391.
Published: 01 May 2020
... individual projects, while maximising the outcomes of scant research and conservation funding. Corresponding author: A.S. Griffin ( andrea.griffin@newcastle.edu.au ) © 2020 Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales 2020 automated telemetry bat insect migration Motus movement ecology...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (2): 214–219.
Published: 11 November 2020
... the bats here, but the cane toad (Bufo marinus) arrived and this seems to have led to the disappearance of the carpet python . We can sympathise with these opinions, because we initially predicted that many Australian snakes would be endangered by the invasion of toads (Phillips et al. 2003), whereas...