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Nesting Resources

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Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
10.7882/FS.2004.004
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... Forest wildlife management in Australian eucalypt forests emphasizes the retention of tree hollows for fauna requiring hollows for nesting or denning. This overlooks the requirements of birds in eucalypt forests for a variety of resources for nesting and foraging other than tree hollows. Some...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1991
10.7882/RZSNSW.1991.002
EISBN: 0-9599951-5-3
... these measures are important, they may not provide the full range of resources required by the eucalypt forest avifauna. In addition to using tree hollows as nest sites, forest birds have specific requirements for nesting materials (e.g., spider web, lichen), for nest sites other than tree hollows, for foraging...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (2): 643–653.
Published: 31 August 2022
.... Several studies advocated the use of novel and emerging technologies to achieve better monitoring of fauna, while others proposed mapping of large scale, as well as micro-refuges, to maximise fire resilience, or the use of supplementary resources such as nest boxes and artificial roosts to replace those...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
10.7882/FS.2011.029
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, during the last ten years, nest boxes have increasingly been used to provide additional roosts for bats in suburban parkland and remnant forest. However, little is known of the relative use of natural hollows and bat boxes, or whether the addition of new roosts may alter...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (2): 206–224.
Published: 05 June 2014
... and the kinds of food resources they require. Although not demonstrated by the data, our impression was that ground-foragers were affected first, with declining numbers and fewer attempts to nest. As habitats continued to become drier, nectar- feeders, herbivores, food nomads, migrants, and canopy- foragers...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (2): 134–138.
Published: 30 September 2014
.... This is consistent with water- filled hollows being a known valuable resource elsewhere (Gibbons and Lindenmayer 2002), and there being a limited supply of terrestrial water sources on the study area. In woodland habitats, emphasis is placed on the importance of conserving tree hollows as shelter and nesting...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2024)
Published: 09 May 2024
... recruitment due to nest or juvenile predation (Chessman 2011). The former explanation (drought) is a clear threat to freshwater turtles since the loss of habitat would remove space and food resources and thus lead to isolated pockets of mortality if turtles could not escape, and/or increased competition...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2023) 43 (1): 15–36.
Published: 02 February 2023
... of migration or regional scale movements. The proportion of nectar and non-nectar foraging did not differ between years or localities, with half of foraging observations being of nectar-feeding. Yellow-plumed Honeyeaters are sensitive to the effects of drought, with less nesting during dry seasons...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2024)
Published: 09 May 2024
...: 6247-6258. httpsdoi.org/10.1002/ece3.3195 Goodenough, A.E., Elliot, S.L. and Hart A.G. 2009. Are nest sites actively chosen? Testing a common assumption for three non-resource limited birds. Acta Oecologica 35: 598-602. httpsdoi.org/10.1016/j.actao.2009.05.003 G uppy, M., Overs A., Guppy S. 2021...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2024)
Published: 08 March 2024
... resources (Papiorek et al., 2016). However, much sensory information is produced 2024 AusZtoraolilaon gist A Price et al. unintentionally. For example, odour emissions from physiological processes, such as metabolism and excretion, are used by predatory weasels to hunt deer mice, bank voles and field voles...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2023) 43 (2): 199–219.
Published: 10 November 2023
... on the seeds of Double Gee Emex australis, an introduced agricultural weed, for food. ABSTRACT Key words Cockatoo breeding biology; nest hollow selection; nestling growth; breeding success; annual survival; cyclone damage to hollow-bearing trees. Published: 10 November 2023 DOI: httpsdoi.org/10.7882/AZ...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2023) 43 (1): 1–144.
Published: 25 August 2023
.... for refuge. However, following the 2017 fire, much of this resource had been burnt and was unavailable. Relative to Southern Brown Bandicoots, Long-nosed Bandicoots were more flexible in their choice of microhabitat for locating their shelters and nests and showed no preference for any microhabitat...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 187–197.
Published: 17 March 2014
... and river operations in the Murray Region. Department of Water Resources: Sydney. Wetland requirements and river operations in the Murray Region Kingsford, R. T. and Johnson, W., 1998. Impact of water diversions on colonially-nesting waterbirds in the Macquarie Marshes of arid Australia. Col...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 591–609.
Published: 01 December 2018
... were being established; revealed the high rate of loss of hollows in trees still alive; shown that lack of nesting hollows may be limiting breeding; demonstrated the efficacy of artificial hollows; established methods for establishing the timing of egg-laying based on measurements of eggs, and aging...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 28 (1-4): 67–73.
Published: 17 March 2014
... in the number of brood and number of males. There were more males present in established colonies than newly founded nests, and although adult males cannot be assumed to be brood from that colony, the difference between the two classes of nest may be indicative of local resource enhancement, similar...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2019) 40 (2): 237–240.
Published: 01 December 2019
... investment is high (Soderquist 1993) and extra food resources are needed to maintain the health of the female. Figure 3. Still images from the video footage showing The Phascogale recorded consuming the eggs was Brush-tailed Phascogale taking an egg from the fake nest. previously recorded on camera traps...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (2): 225–233.
Published: 26 August 2014
... open grasslands in winter that are not habitable in summer and, by establishing temporary grass nests in winter, it is able to gain access to abundant palatable resources that are not normally available under shrub cover. Therefore it does not need to broaden its dietary niche during winter because...