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aesthetics

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Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.091
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
...-term viability of urban wetlands relies on the ability of managers to balance aesthetics and conservation on the one hand, with recreational land use issues on the other. Next to the management of human recreation, the management of problem fauna, including native species that have the potential...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (2): 214–227.
Published: 01 January 2018
... significant threats to the biota include: changed fire regimes; exotic predators, diseases and herbivores; and drought and climate change. Conservation reserves in the region were originally chosen on aesthetic appeal, often aligning poorly to modern CAR (comprehensive, adequate and representative) criteria...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2015) 37 (4): 461–471.
Published: 01 September 2015
... is the dispersal of exotic weeds, although evidence in Australia remains anecdotal. There has also been preliminary evidence of interspecific competition on islands and predation of nestlings. While aesthetically appreciated and a predator of some invertebrate pests, it causes crop failure in soft-fruit and citrus...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2007.053
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-0-5
... are fragile and low in productivity, and thus should be managed sensitively to exploit such attributes as their intense solar radiation and great aesthetic values. There is also recognition that although the semi-arid regions on the fringes of the true deserts have offered more potential for human settlement...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.023
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... in the landscape while reducing road mortality. Alternatively, where roads carry few vehicles, keeping canopy above the road is a cost-effective means of maintaining connectivity for wildlife and aesthetics for tourists without a high road toll, while also reducing road erosion, edge effects, and weed and feral...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.095
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
... Deer were introduced into Australia by acclimatisation societies in the late 19 th and early 20 th centuries to enhance the aesthetics of the local environment and provide sport. Several of these populations survived and formed the basis of larger, well established wild deer populations. Deer...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.097
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
... of how these remnants function in the estuarine ecosystem. In addition, they have aesthetic, recreational and educational values. To illustrate these values, the wetlands of Bicentennial Park and Newington at Homebush Bay on the Parramatta River in Sydney are used. These wetlands, which are adjacent...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.102
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
... and with lower inputs of chemicals and water. In the year 2020 it is envisioned that there is a focus on vegetation from local provenance species and gardens are structured to mimic natural ecosystems to maximise benefits for wildlife. Gardens based on European aesthetic concepts are out of fashion...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.047
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... infections are transmitted directly to humans, direct contact with an ABL-infected flying-foxes presents a serious human health risk from a saliva-contaminated bite, scratch or mucous membrane. Fruit is not regarded as a mode of transmission, but for aesthetic and general hygiene reasons, eating fruit...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (3): 306–314.
Published: 17 March 2014
... and intellectual barriers that would separate culture and nature including those that would keep apart city and wilderness are being breached, despite attempts to shore them up. Debates about everything from gene technology and green technology to the aesthetics of gardening and the politics of companion animals...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (4): 585–604.
Published: 01 June 2020
... perform. Aesthetic Primary interest in the symbolic appeal and physical attractiveness of native Australian wildlife. Domonistic Primary interest in the control and management of native Australian wildlife. Negativistic Primary orientation a dislike or fear of native Australian wildlife species. Table 1...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2015) 37 (3): 423.
Published: 14 April 2015
... featured artists. None of the each other; it will delight its reader intellectually and chapters pretends to be exhaustive of the taxa, the books aesthetically. And any profit from the book s modest price or the illustrations; each reflects its author s choices, and feeds straight back into the on-going...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 28 (1-4): 19–23.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... " "Scientists reject conclusions bared on emotion, moral judgements, and social or aesthetic valves . . . " (Latin 1992, unpublished abstract How Scientists Can Help Cmerue Coral Reefs Constrained in these ways, it is almost impossible to communicate in simple language or to comment on environmental issues when...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (3): 281–288.
Published: 01 June 2017
... of conserving nature has strong advocates in many walks of life and it repays society by giving future generations options to see and manage the world and its vital constituent parts ranging from health, food security to an aesthetic view of our environment. In stark contrast to this attractive notion...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (1): 108–118.
Published: 17 March 2014
... species such as Llama Lama glama and Alpaca L. pacos (King 1990a). 3. Acclimatisation and sport European colonists also introduced an eclectic mix of plants, birds and mammals for more aesthetic reasons. The dense wet New Zealand bush that confronted these first settlers was a far cry from the civilised...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (2): 365–375.
Published: 17 March 2014
... size (Table l), quolls were on average considered more favourable in aesthetic appeal, less noisy and less expensive. Quolls were similar to cats in ease of feeding, time involvement, ease of housing, odour and temperament. Quolls were less favourable than cats in com- panionship, playfulness and ease...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2016) 38 (2): 235–256.
Published: 01 January 2016
... quite not look out of place on your wall, or even in a gallery, deliberately catch the train from Redfern to Burwood. It but each plate is not just aesthetically pleasing. They are knew exactly what it was doing, and very purposefully went detailed and accurate and the lifelikeness that is captured...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (4): 446–457.
Published: 17 March 2014
... that The most preferred groups were domesticated, aesthetically appealing, and game animals. The least preferred were the biting and 6 For further information on Fraser Island s geography and ecology see, for example, Carruthers et al. (1986), Sinclair (1997), Queensland Government (1991), Bonyhady (1993...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 25 (3): 65–67.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... Old fallen logs offer an aesthetically pleasing alternative. If you really want to use rocks in landscaping, large and attractive sandstone boulders can be bought from quar- ries: they will take a little while to "age" and grow lichens, etc., but you will have the satisfaction of knowing that you...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 39 (1): 85–102.
Published: 01 December 2017
...) and because they damage the aesthetics of urban areas. Pigeons are clearly de-domesticated, and hence are legitimately considered feral in that sense. But then there are lots of pet species and other introductions that have established feral populations (for a thorough review see Long 1981), but few...