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Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1994.006
EISBN: 0-9599951-9-6
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (1): 1–14.
Published: 02 June 2014
... inextricably linked to the expansion of the island's nascent phosphate industry. The endemic rats were killed off by a disease introduced with black rats R. rattus , which according to the mining company manager Captain Samuel Vincent, were bought to the island by the SS Hindustan that arrived in December 1899...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 0001
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1989a.002
EISBN: 978-0-9599951-1-4
... Australasia at some time between the mid-Cretaceous and Eocene by waif dispersal from South America. The ancestors of the New Zealand chiropteran genus Mystacina arrived from South America by waif dispersal, probably about 35 million years ago. The remaining Chiroptera of the region are Asiatic in origin...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2012) 35 (4): 1033–1039.
Published: 29 January 2012
... is dominated by introduced Black Rats Rattus rattus . In particular, the Bush Rat Rattus fuscipes is absent yet remains abundant in comparable habitats to the north and south of Sydney; the last record of the Bush Rat near Sydney Harbour is from 1901. In this paper we explore the idea that the arrival...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (2): 214–219.
Published: 11 November 2020
... of Carpet Pythons, but paradoxically, our surveys at this site reveal a twofold increase in abundance of Carpet Pythons since the arrival of toads. Toad invasion likely has favoured pythons by reducing the abundance of large monitor lizards, that are both predators and competitors of Carpet Pythons...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 124–138.
Published: 01 October 2020
... regularly occupied two camps in Batemans Bay, New South Wales (NSW). At one site, the Water Gardens, impacts on adjacent residents and businesses occur when animals roost near the reserve boundaries. During March–July 2016, a large influx of flying-foxes arrived, causing the camps to spread...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (3): 434–439.
Published: 01 September 2018
... the proximity of others. During the spring mating season (August–September) of 2017, a large male Carpet Python took up residence with a reproductive female on the roof of a house in northeastern New South Wales for at least six weeks, and was observed in intense battles with two rival males that arrived...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 39 (1): 57–67.
Published: 01 December 2017
... zoological interest. The lack of diversity of food options strikes a zoologist as basis for concern about how we can manage the future of our food supplies. Zooarchaeologist Juliet Clutton-Brock adds a new dimension to the debate by looking at the arrival of animals as domesticates. In Europe, she says...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (3): 388–397.
Published: 17 March 2014
... donkeys arrived in New South Wales in 1793 but they were not greatly used by Europeans to colonise the land in Eastern Australia. They came into wider use with the opening up of Central and Western Australia in the 1860s and were extensively employed until the late 1930s for freight haulage in more...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (3): 287–298.
Published: 17 March 2014
... crocodilians in this region are more recent arrivals from Asia. Mekosuchines display a variety of ecomorphs in head shape ranging from small and deep to longirostrine to very deep snouted and the significance of these is discussed. Anderson, C., 1937, Palaeontalogical notes No. 111. Rec. Aus. Mus...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2013
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2013.013
EISBN: 978-0-9874309-1-5
... and fierce competition for research funding. The newest development in science education at the tertiary level is the arrival of Massive On-line Open Courses (MOOCs), which has the potential to alter universities and academics. The troubling reality is that science education will not improve at tertiary...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.054
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-8-1
... religious groups that are hostile to science, a political or commercial stance that sees short-term gains in rejecting or undermining science, or a non-zoological understanding of animals that arrives at a philosophical position opposed to the study and management of wild animals. The extreme ‘animal rights...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 383–430.
Published: 14 October 2011
...Daniel Lunney This paper traces the post World War II debate over kangaroo management, and how the various parties have managed the issue to arrive at the current levels of kangaroo harvest, with particular reference to NSW and the transition of policy from culling kangaroos as an agricultural pest...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.035
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... possible to arrive at a set of actions to provide a basis for management, both at a funding level and a field level, for which research is an integral part. The PAS for bats represents the first official DECCW statement of recovery actions required for all bat species listed as threatened. It provides...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.047
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... conditions. Bent-wing bats arrive at the eastern Sydney sites in late February or early March and remain there throughout the winter. They depart in October and November, much later than has been reported for bats elsewhere in Sydney. In March 2005, two female bats were observed with young at Malabar...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2007.005
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-1-2
... for public anger? Will the recent detection of a second species of toad in Australia, the Asian Black-spined toad B. melanostictus , be greeted with the same response or will it be accepted as a new arrival? ...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2007.018
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-1-2
... The Australian White Ibis Threskiornis molucca is an unexpected addition to the small number of native birds that have recently moved into urban and suburban areas. The arrival of the species in the Central Business District of Brisbane in South East Queensland has been accompanied...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2007.019
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-1-2
... Dramatic changes to Victorian landscapes and faunal assemblages followed the arrival of Europeans. Many species of birds and mammals declined or disappeared from large parts of their former ranges. Conversely, these ecological changes provided opportunities for a small number of species...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2004) 32 (4): 605–628.
Published: 01 December 2004
... has been a two-step process, with an initial loss of mammals in the semi-arid interior, followed by a subsequent loss from mesic woodland and coastal sites. His collections preceded the arrival of foxes Vulpes vulpes to the State and largely preceded the spread of rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.077
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
... species. Analyses of individual species' abundances revealed three distinct species groups. “Aussi Icons” are large-bodied, often ground-feeding species, that characterise well-vegetated suburbs and 1-2 ha remnants of eucalypt forest (“bushlots”). “New Arrivals” are a group of mixed habits...