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Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 0001
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1998.024
EISBN: 9780958608503
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (3): 283–289.
Published: 17 March 2014
...Darren Shelly Sixteen Barking Owl Ninox connivens records, accounting for 29 birds were made by Department of Infrastructure, Planning and Natural Resources (DIPNR) staff from 1996-2004 within the lower Macquarie River floodplain in New South Wales. Records suggest a strong association between owl...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1991
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1991.012
EISBN: 0-9599951-5-3
... The importance of trees as nesting and foraging sites was investigated for 12 species of small, native, ground-dwelling mammals in 13 forests in southeastern and southwestern Australia. At least half of all observed foraging occurred on tree surfaces or hollows, loose bark, logs or leaf litter...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 864–869.
Published: 20 October 2011
...Hugh McGregor This survey aimed to determine whether Barking Owls McGregor. Ninox connivens are still declining in south-west NSW; and if there are resident pairs of Powerful Owls Ninox strenua present in south-west NSW State Forests. Surveys for Barking Owls were conducted in and around eight...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.027
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... The spatial patterns of Sooty Owl Tyto tenebricosa and Barking Owl Ninox connivens records, obtained from large owl surveys in the Victorian Central Highlands and the Pilliga Scrub in New South Wales respectively, allow the suggestion to be made that these species select territories...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (1): 78–84.
Published: 04 October 2011
..., playback of recorded calls and spotlighting was used. Barking Owls Ninox connivens were recorded primarily from River Red Gum Eucalyptus camaldulensis vegetation associations (n = 8) and once from mixed Western Grey Box Eucalyptus microcarpa / River Red Gum association. No records of the Powerful Owl N...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 22 (3): 1–9.
Published: 17 March 2014
... and amphibians were surveyed by methods such as turning logs, rocks and bark, checking hollow logs, raking through leaf-litter, driving along roads and tracks and listening for frog calls. Surveys were carried out each month from August to December 1980 (a total of 260 person days). The forest was resurveyed...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 23 (3): 41–49.
Published: 17 March 2014
... and Fox scats in Mumbulla State Forest Remains were also found in owl pellets (Smith 1984). In December of 1981,1983 and 1984 nests of juveniles were found during searches for reptiles (Lunney and Barker 1986b). In 1981 a juvenile male weighing 10 g was found in a shallow depression under a sheet of bark...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 23 (2): 19–28.
Published: 17 March 2014
... 5 24 HALL, L. AND RICHARDS, G., 1979. Bats of Eastern Australia. Qld. Mus. Booklet No. 12, Brisbane. LUNNEDY., (in press). Effects of logging, fire and drought on possums and gliders in the coastal forest near Bega, New South Wales. Aust. Wildl. Res. LUNNEY, D., BARKE, J. AND PRIDDEL...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021)
Published: 04 August 2021
... foraging guilds. Bark and foliage foragers differed most frequently between pairs of plots in all seasons and years, with aerial foragers showing the fewest differences. Between seasons and years differences were greatest among ground-foragers and foliage-foragers where respectively 76% and 80...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.004
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... birds nest only on vertical or horizontal dead branches, while others require shrubs or dense ground vegetation. There are significant differences between plant species in the foraging resources available to birds. For example, bark type and the associated arthropod fauna differ between tree species...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.875
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... of bark-, log- and rock-dwellers. High shrub density in the 11–20 year old regrowth provides some explanation for lower numbers of skinks recorded. Shrub density may affect the availability of basking sites for reptiles at ground level and the accessibility and searching behaviour of observers. Ambient...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2016) 38 (1): 130–146.
Published: 01 January 2016
... manoeuvres differed between locations. Differences in foraging ecology between locations were primarily related to differences in flowering phenology and vegetation structure (e.g., height, type of bark) and floristics, which in turn affected the food resources available to honeyeaters. Our observations...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2016) 38 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 January 2016
... manoeuvres and substrates, as well as foraging heights and the plant species frequented to find food. The continued abundance and diversity of species/guilds through the winter is best explained by the variety of food resources available for birds; the complexity of foliage, bark, and ground substrates...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.086
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
... of bushland and reserves. The Sooty Owl and the Masked Owl are restricted to a few such locations near Sydney, but both are more common in the wetter and the drier forests, respectively, of the Central Coast. The Barking Owl appears to be uncommon and of concern because this species is poorly conserved...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020)
Published: 11 August 2020
... in maremma sheepdogs. If threat was inside range, they left sheep in pursuit of threat . If threat was outside range, they just barked, and scent marked. Thus, protection appears to extend beyond the immediate vicinity of livestock, so they do maintain a larger territory. van Bommel and Johnson (2015...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (1): 65–67.
Published: 17 March 2014
... Eucalyptus and Metrosideros (Myrtaceae) from South Australia and New South Wales respectively. New exit holes (Fig. Id) were observed. Each hole measured about 1&11 mm wide and 6 mm high. In order to examine the larval chambers, strips of bark were removed from the trunk and during this process a number...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2015) 37 (4): 501–507.
Published: 01 September 2015
... (genus Litoria) exploit a variety of natural and artificial retreat sites. Gibbons and Lindenmayer (2002) list seven Australian species as using tree hollows; while a further 17 species are recognised as potential hollow-users, including the Bleating Tree Frog. Exfoliating bark also provides arboreal...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2019) 40 (2): 251–255.
Published: 01 December 2019
... been made through direct observation or inferred from presence of bark fibres in faeces, which is assumed to be indicative of wood gouging behaviour associated with sap feeding (Smith 1982; Smith and Russell 1982; Goldingay 1987; Goldingay and Jackson 2004). Although thought to be less important...