1-20 of 42 Search Results for

bat injuries

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.090
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
... indicate that a disused railway tunnel at North Sydney was occupied during most months of the year until its abandonment by bats during the 1980s. It also was known to, at times, accommodate double the maximum number of bats recorded in any roost investigated since 1995. Investigation of injury rates...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 698–710.
Published: 20 October 2011
... of injuries, was compiled on 136 collected bats. The sex ratio was strongly skewed towards females (1:1.73), of which 54 (65%) were lactating at the time.Thirteen of these were shot while carrying their dependent young, while 41 neonates would have been left behind in the camp to die. Hence, the total...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 82–91.
Published: 17 March 2014
... 1996). and it is likely that young birds form a significant proportion of the prey of M . gigas. They would be more easily captured and possibly less skilled in defending themselves, thus reducing potential injury to the bat. This could be particularly important with larger birds with strong bills...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (3): 351–357.
Published: 17 March 2014
... injuries on these bats and only the poor state of their gums and teeth could be regarded as possible contributing factors to their deaths. The colony of 29 S.fiuiumtris at Bdghtview represents the largest colony recorded for this species. Although few records of roosting behaviour and colony sizes...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (2): 298–315.
Published: 17 March 2014
... issues involving the transmission, or possibility of transmission, of serious viral diseases by these large bats. Such issues require informed public discussion. It is the joint responsibility of science/medical professionals and journalists to ensure that such discussion occurs. Australian Bat...
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/9780980327243
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2012) 36 (1): 5–19.
Published: 07 September 2012
..., images and audiences. Pine Forge Press, Thousand Oaks, California, USA. Media/Society: industries, images and audiences Divljan, A., Parry-Jones, K. and Eby, P. 2011. Deaths and injuries to Grey-headed Flying-foxes, Pteropus poliocephalus shot at an orchard near Sydney, New South Wales...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 26 (1): 21–22.
Published: 17 March 2014
...M. V. Ellis; J. M. Smith ELLIS, M. V., WILLIAMS, C. R. AND WILSON, P., 1989. Extension to the known range of Gould's Long-eared bat Nyctophilus gouldi Tomes, 1858 (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) in New South Wales. Aust. Zool. 25: 79-82. Extension to the known range of Gould's Long...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 58–73.
Published: 01 October 2020
... animals Figure 1. Native animals in the wildlife rehabilitation sector s temporary care. (A) Common Brush-tailed The Code of Practice for Injured, Sick and Orphaned Possums Trichosurus vulpecula recovering from injuries. Protected Fauna (OEH 2011) sets out the standards (B) An immobile Masked Lapwing...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2012) 35 (4): 996–1004.
Published: 29 January 2012
... authors admit to having been diving and swimming for decades with no serious injuries. Common sense should be used especially when diving or swimming in remote waters, which includes much of Western Australia. While concentrating on WA, much of what is written is applicable to other parts of Australia...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 124–138.
Published: 01 October 2020
... prejudices toward bats (Lunney and Moon 2011). (Eby and Law 2008). Winter and spring are usually the Residents close to camps are generally tolerant when leanest periods of nectar production (Parry-Jones and flying-foxes are in small numbers, but tensions build when Augee 1991a; Eby 1995). These seasonal...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (3): 379–391.
Published: 01 May 2020
... projects, while maximising the outcomes of scant research and conservation funding. Corresponding author: A.S. Griffin ( andrea.griffin@newcastle.edu.au ) © 2020 Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales 2020 automated telemetry bat insect migration Motus movement ecology telemetry...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (1): 76–100.
Published: 17 March 2014
... and Abundance of Animals 31 54 Baker, J.R. and Baker, Z., 1936. The seasons in a tropical rain forest (New Hebrides). Pt. 3. Fruit Bats (Pteropodidae). Journal of the Linnean. Society (Zoology). 40: 123-142. The seasons in a tropical rain forest (New Hebrides). Pt. 3. Fruit Bats (Pteropodidae...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021)
Published: 02 February 2021
... being attacked by a Florida Keys Giant Centipede Scolopendra alternans. The centipede initially held onto grass stems but was eventually dislodged and dragged about six metres by the toad. The centipede inflicted serious (probably, fatal) injury on the toad but released the amphibian after the centipede...
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 0001
DOI: 10.7882/CHANA.1990
EISBN: 0-949324-29-9
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (3): 289–307.
Published: 01 June 2017
... and publications of the Royal Zoological Society of NSW are one example of that enterprise. There is a good spread of other societies, such as the Ecological Society of Australia and the Society for Conservation Biology, and specialist groups, such as the Australian Mammal Society, the Australasian Bat Society...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (2): 186–193.
Published: 30 September 2020
...; Taylor 2020). During summers, bushfires combined with ongoing drought conditions and heatwaves have an immediate impact on wildlife through the onset of injuries and deaths (e.g. Russell et al. 2003; Wallis 2013). During the 2019-20 summer, expert opinion from the University of Sydney (2020) estimated...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (1): 95–101.
Published: 21 March 2014
... to Reptiles of New South Wales Threlfall, C.G., Law, B. and Banks, P.B. 2012. Influence of landscape structure and human modifications on insect biomass and bat foraging activity in an urban landscape. PloS ONE 7: 1-10. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0038800 White, A.W. 2010.Neverfail Bay...
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/9780958608572
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 769–783.
Published: 01 December 2018
... weeks old, they were leg-banded with both a colour leg band and a metallic Australian Bird and Bat Banding Scheme (ABBBS) numbered band. At the time of banding, a feather was plucked from the breast of chicks and sent to the Australian Museum for genetic sex determination. Semi- regular call play-back...