1-20 of 58 Search Results for

bats in the media

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (4): 505–517.
Published: 01 September 2017
... is needed to produce a more nuanced public discourse. © 2017 Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales 2017 Hendra framing human-wildlife conflict media bats flying-foxes 5052017 Australian Zoologist volume 38 (4) Introduction Human-wildlife conflicts pose a growing challenge...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (2): 298–315.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... On the transmssion of bat diseases by the media - a view from the trenches Len Martin Department of Physiology & Pharmacology, University of Queensland, 4072, Australia Address for correspondence: P.O. Box 61Nimbin NSW, 2480, Australia E-mail: leonard.martin@mailbox.uq.edu.au A B ST R A C T Do scientists maintain...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.008
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... We have been struck by the paucity of coverage of bats in the media, even though they constitute a quarter of the Australian mammal fauna. The Microchiroptera are almost invisible to the public, but the Megachiroptera come to public attention mostly when camping in or near towns or in orchards...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.049
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... Conservation of flying-foxes is dependent upon a greater understanding by the general public of their role in the environment and their behavioural characteristics. Negative stereotypes and attitudes perpetuated through the media can have a detrimental impact on their conservation. Since 1985...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.037
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... the research needed to manage flying-foxes on crops is far from complete and there has been no summary or correlation of the many research papers published that suggests a way forward. Now that the Grey-headed Flying-fox has been listed as Vulnerable, I have the fear that orchardists will lose out as some bat...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 19–41.
Published: 01 October 2020
... 2010; Pike et al. 2017). The capacity for receive considerable attention in the print media (Ford flight has enabled bats to disperse over fragmented remnants 2002; Jemison 2017). However, the focus often relates to of bushland, often representing a major component of urban negative interactions...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2012) 36 (1): 5–19.
Published: 07 September 2012
... and conservation of Australasian bats xx xx Miles, B. and Morse, R. 2007. The role of news media in natural disaster risk and recovery. Ecological Economics 63: 365-373. The role of news media in natural disaster risk and recovery Ecological Economics 63 365 373 Parnaby, H. E. 2009...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 124–138.
Published: 01 October 2020
... prejudices toward bats (Lunney and Moon 2011). (Eby and Law 2008). Winter and spring are usually the Residents close to camps are generally tolerant when leanest periods of nectar production (Parry-Jones and flying-foxes are in small numbers, but tensions build when Augee 1991a; Eby 1995). These seasonal...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (3): 281–288.
Published: 01 June 2017
.... most bats (Law et al. 2011). When we see concerted action on some species, strong decisions about some topics, and clear messages about stewardship or active management, we tend to relax. That is dangerous for our zoological heritage because most species are out of sight, and the natural resources upon...
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/9780980327243
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 29 (1-2): 1–2.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... A sound species taxonomy is crucial to the conservation of forest bats. Pp. 101-12 in Conservation of Australia's Forest Fauna ed by D. Lunney. Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales: Mosman. Conservation of Australia's Forest Fauna 101 12 PONDER, W., 1992. Bias or biodiversity. Aust. Zool...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (3): 259–260.
Published: 17 March 2014
... stranding. Without their thoughtful presentation, the only source of inlormation Ibt- most readers would be the media. This papet- helps develop a serious and competent response to cetacean conservation. covering letter she sent with her final draft that Bats are emerging as a topic of sel-ious the tahles...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (2): 207–213.
Published: 01 January 2018
... Prevention). Basically we re having a similar problem and would be to say, as a precautionary measure, we don t I wanted to bring it up in relation to bats as well. The know. We really don t have a good understanding. media loves anything that s scary and, you know, one bat at the beginning of that movie...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (1990) 26 (2): 42–43.
Published: 01 June 1990
... to be obtained from NPWS offices. Education A children's story "A Bat Came to Stay" by ten year old Catherine Pallin with illustrations by Martyn Robinson was widely publicized by the media and provided 42 Australian Zoologist, Vol. 26(2) our first, easy to read information on the Grey-headed Flying-fox...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (2): 288–297.
Published: 17 March 2014
... scientists, especially zoologists, fared in the reporting. The following conclusions were drawn: there was a sustained media interest in animals; animal welfare was the dominant theme; risk to humans was the second most important issue; and although scientists were consistently mentioned, science...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 1–2.
Published: 17 March 2014
... and migratory makes them enigmatic, but they should not be allowed to slide towards extinction given the additional new evidence that this is what appears to be happening. These bird and bat pape;; raise another 'g'enerar observation. If one is concerned with conserving biodiversity, then focusing only...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (3): 457–463.
Published: 01 June 2017
...) do not necessarily extend to pest species, i.e. those which have a negative impact on humans, even when they are native (e.g. Fitzgibbon and Jones 2006; Dowle and Deane 2009). It is rare that negative interactions between humans and wildlife culminate in human death, but when this does occur, media...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (2): 119–124.
Published: 10 October 2011
.... are a prominent component of the urban fauna in eastern and northern Australia (Parry Jones 1987; Markus and Hall 2004). Flying-foxes typically roost during the day in communal camps that range in size from just a few individuals to hundreds of thousands of bats and they may be occupied seasonally...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 28 (1-4): 23–27.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... A sound species taxonomy is crucial to the conservation of forest bats. Pp. 101-12 in Conservation of Australia's Forest Fauna ed by D. Lunney. Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales: Mosman. Conservation of Australia's Forest Fauna 101 12 PONDER, W., 1992. Bias or biodiversity. Aust. Zool...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (2): 287.
Published: 17 March 2014
... of wildlife reporting in two daily newspapers. Len Martin: Observations on the transmission of bat diseases by the media. Bob Beale: Attack of the killer rabbits: how the rabbit calicivirus story escaped. Michelle Christy: Making headlines or saving a species. Paul Willis: Crossing over: making the change...