1-20 of 263 Search Results for

bird feeding

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2008
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2008.029
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-2-9
... at feeding sites and nutritional problems. Management strategies aim to control access, visitor numbers, the nature and quality of provisioned food and the educational value of the viewing experience. Management styles cater for different circumstances and include wild bird feeding operations, wildlife...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.077
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
... in aggressively excluding the small foliage-feeding birds from partly-vegetated areas and small bushlots. The abundance of noisy miners was negatively correlated with the number of small-bodied bird species, across all well-vegetated sites, and also within individual types of land cover. Noisy miners occur...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.076
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
... the transect. Of these, 20 % increased in abundance and 40 % decreased with 10 species proceeding to local extinction. Since 1928, Kings Park and the urban landscape of Perth has been increasingly dominated by large nectar-feeding and seed-eating birds. Small insectivores, particularly ground and shrub...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2016) 38 (1): 130–146.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Harry F. Recher; Mike C. Calver; William E. Davis, Jr. Nectar-feeding birds are commonly the most abundant birds in Australian eucalypt forests and woodlands, where they play a key role as pollinators of native plants. Among the nectar-feeders, honeyeaters (Meliphagidae) are particularly aggressive...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2008
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2008.023
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-2-9
... Human disturbance is caused by the mere presence of humans in the environment. As both predation risk and human disturbance redirect time and energy from other fitness-enhancing activities such as reproduction and feeding, perceived predation risk appears to be useful in the understanding...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 82–91.
Published: 17 March 2014
...-frequenting species comprise about a quarter of the prey records. Birds may be captured at most levels of the strata, from the ground to the canopy, and in flight. Ghost Bats feed on a wide size range of avian prey, and although they may take animals up to about two-thirds their own mass, they have...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.091
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
... waste management practices and the community's “need to feed” friendly birds. Ibis have established viable colonies in urban areas with population numbers in the thousands. The Australian White Ibis Threskiornis molucca population in metropolitan Sydney has increased considerably over the past 15...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2007.023
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-1-2
... or deliberate releases from aviaries are major sources of birds that establish viable populations, although even in these populations, numbers may also have been supplemented by vagrants. We suggest that supplementary feeding, and changes in the vegetation in the city landscape, are major contributing factors...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (1): 29–39.
Published: 02 June 2014
... with decreased reporting rates post- drought. The other 13 listed species were recorded in fewer than one percent of the surveys, with four being at the edges of their ranges. Feeding guilds and taxonomic groups Both mistletoe specialists, the Mistletoe Bird and Painted Honeyeater, were recorded about 1.5 times...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (1): 34–38.
Published: 17 March 2014
... necessitates a simultaneous study of all major feeding grounds for waders along the east coast. Hindwood, K. A., 1942. The birds of Long Reef, New South Wales. Proc. Zool. Soc. NSW 1942: 1633. The birds of Long Reef, New South Wales Proc. Zool. Soc. NSW 1942 1633 McGill, A. R., 1943...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2015) 37 (3): 337–342.
Published: 14 April 2015
... In the midst of losing natural habitat, these frugivorous birds did show some adaptability to a changed landscape. Joe Smith observed Topknot Pigeons feeding in fruiting trees on his Stockyard Mountain property between the 1910 s and 1980 s. The open paddocks contained Moreton Bay Figs Ficus macrophylla, one...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (3): 470–481.
Published: 17 March 2014
... of small birds, which may have been indicative of the presence of a dense understorey and shrub layer in conjunction with a distinct tree canopy. Overall waterbird abundance and diversity was low due to flood conditions and local rainfall providing ample feeding and nesting areas, thus spreading...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.048
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... research, monitoring and adaptive management. Vertebrate wildlife (mainly birds and mammals) has been a major focus of this review. The main strategic research questions concern the successional effects of logging, the relative merits and costs of integration or segregation and the appropriate scale...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (2): 206–224.
Published: 05 June 2014
... searched the entire plot each count in 2008. Breeding Observations HFR recorded all instances of breeding activity encountered during studies of foraging behaviour and bird censuses, including those detected by WED. This included courtship (e.g., males feeding females, displays/song), copulation, nest site...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021)
Published: 04 June 2021
... (Malurus). Emu 90: 7-14. APPENDIX 1Appendix. 1. Nests were found by watching every bird that was seen until we were confident that it was either doing something to do with a nest (e.g. building, brooding, collecting food for young birds, feeding a mate just off a nest, defending a nest...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2016) 38 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 January 2016
... Scarlet Robin and White-eared Honeyeater also hawked (Table 4). Use of Plant Species Few plants flowered during the winter, with a total of 148 observations of nectar-feeding for eight species of birds: Brown Thornbill (9), Brown-headed Honeyeater (20), Crescent Honeyeater (10), Crimson Rosella (5), Red...
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 0001
DOI: 10.7882/CHANA.1990
EISBN: 0-949324-29-9
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2013) 36 (2): 209–228.
Published: 07 February 2013
...) with single winter record. Usually seen flying low over River Red Gum forest, cypress-eucalypt woodland or farmland. Additional sightings include pair perched at potential nest site in large River Red Gum (in October), single male feeding on ground in River Red Gum forest, group of 8 birds in cypress pine...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 826–842.
Published: 20 October 2011
..., is considered a significant contributory factor to the survival of mammal biodiversity within this region. One benefit attributed to these toxic plants is buffering the predatory impact of introduced carnivores, with native fauna becoming toxic to predators from feeding on the plants. This study supports...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2019) 40 (2): 237–240.
Published: 01 December 2019
... of a wild Brush-tailed Phascogale feeding on eggs taken from a bird nest and the predation of a Grey Shrike- thrush Colluricincla harmonica. Observations A Brush-tailed Phascogale was monitored on a regular basis with the use of a baited camera trap (Reconyx Ultrafire XR6) and by observing it from a short...