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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 19–41.
Published: 01 October 2020
...Matthew Mo; Mike Roache; Rebecca Williams; Ian N. Drinnan; Beth Noël ABSTRACT The management of the Kareela flying-fox camp in southern Sydney, New South Wales, is a case study of the challenges faced by local councils trying to mitigate negative impacts from flying-foxes on their communities. When...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.019
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... within an hour. When fully alert, each bat was released back into the camp by flying it across a lawn to the roost trees. No casualties resulted from capturing or processing the flying-foxes, and no processed animal was subsequently found ill or dead as a result of this study. ...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.057
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 124–138.
Published: 01 October 2020
...Matthew Mo; Mike Roache; Deb Lenson; Heidi Thomson; Mitchell Jarvis; Natalie Foster; Angie Radford; Lorraine Oliver; Damon L. Oliver; Joss Bentley ABSTRACT Flying-fox camps in urban areas are a contentious wildlife management issue. Since 2012, Grey-headed Flying-foxes Pteropus poliocephalus have...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.028
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... Managing flying-fox camps is an increasing challenge for agencies responsible for managing wildlife and residential communities along the east coast of Australia. Conflict has arisen between humans and flying-foxes when camp sites were established in urban areas or when people have settled close...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.054
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... The management of flying-fox camps is pivotal to the overall conservation and management of flying-foxes. This paper employs an historical approach to assess the effectiveness of camp removal in the Brisbane area as a tool in the management of flying-foxes. Much of what has been learnt...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.051
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... In the past two decades the management of flying-fox camps in New South Wales has shifted from a largely unregulated process controlled by local communities to a highly restrictive process regulated by government agencies. At the same time the human population in coastal areas inhabited...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.056
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... strategies to limit conflict with neighbours. This paper documents the conservation status of Grey-headed Flying-fox camps located east of the escarpment in NSW and explores the potential to use existing planning instruments to 1) protect roost vegetation from clearing and 2) limit conflict with humans...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.053
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... In May 2001 the Grey-headed Flying-fox was listed on Schedule 2 of the Threatened Species Conservation (TSC) Act. The NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service (NPWS) now has a regulatory role in the protection of the ‘camps’, or roosting colonies, of this species wherever they may occur...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (2): 119–124.
Published: 10 October 2011
...Peter Phillips; Philip Hauser; Mike Letnic This paper reports upon an operation to displace camps of Black Flying-foxes Pteropus alecto using non-lethal methods from the town of Batchelor. The flying-foxes showed a preference for camping in African Mahogany trees Khala senegalensis . Flying-foxes...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 240–253.
Published: 17 March 2014
... was highly concentrated into small habitat areas associated with this flowering. The species occupied 11 camps which were located at irregular intervals along the coast, north from the Sydney region. Over 99% of the New South Wales population occurred in nine camps. The total abundance of animals...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.052
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... This paper summarises 12 months of research at the Royal Botanic Gardens in Sydney to manage a permanent camp of Grey-headed Flying-foxes Pteropus poliocephalus that had encamped in an area of culturally significant trees. New and innovative methods came to light from these studies. Numbers...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.055
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... There is little information available on which to base strategies for managing colonies of Grey-headed Flying-foxes Pteropus poliocephalus in urban areas. Since 1985, the Ku-ring-gai Bat Conservation Society (KBCS) has managed a program of habitat restoration in the flying-fox camp at Ku-ring...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 38–54.
Published: 17 March 2014
...Stephen Garnett; Olivia Whybird; Hugh Spencer A survey of all known Spectacled Flying Fox camps in the wet tropics was undertaken in March 1998 with the assistance of volunteers. About 153 000 flying foxes were counted at 12 major camps. These data are compared with historical data and the status...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (3): 447–457.
Published: 17 March 2014
...Linda Christesen; John Nelson The vocalisations emitted by adult and juvenile Grey-headed Flying-foxes Pteropus poliocephalus (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae) within daytime camps and night nurseries were studied using audio and video data. The calls were differentiated via discriminant analysis...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 698–710.
Published: 20 October 2011
... of injuries, was compiled on 136 collected bats. The sex ratio was strongly skewed towards females (1:1.73), of which 54 (65%) were lactating at the time.Thirteen of these were shot while carrying their dependent young, while 41 neonates would have been left behind in the camp to die. Hence, the total...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.009
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... Roost trees at three Pteropus conspicillatus camps in the Australian Wet Tropics were monitored for the presence and absence of individuals over a four month period. The number of individual P. conspicillatus in roost trees varied on a variety of time scales, with seasonal changes...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.028
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... to be primary management tools despite their failure either to provide consistent protection to the commercial fruit industry or to resolve conflict at controversial camps. There is an urgent need to develop new approaches to flying-fox management. It is our view that effective methods of on-crop control...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.008
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... We have been struck by the paucity of coverage of bats in the media, even though they constitute a quarter of the Australian mammal fauna. The Microchiroptera are almost invisible to the public, but the Megachiroptera come to public attention mostly when camping in or near towns or in orchards...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021)
Published: 09 August 2021