1-20 of 32 Search Results for

carbon dioxide

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.010
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-6-7
... Elevations in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) are anticipated to acidify oceans because of fundamental changes in ocean chemistry created by CO 2 absorption from the atmosphere into the oceans in a process known as ocean acidification. Over the next century, elevated CO 2 is expected...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.022
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-6-7
... of which we address in this paper. The first problem is that of extreme weather and the second is the change of leaf quality from rising levels of carbon dioxide. This paper capitalises on our field study in Gunnedah, in north-west NSW, which examined a 1990s success story where the local koala population...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 431.
Published: 14 October 2011
... Biology 15 2206 2223 Solomon, S., Plattner, G.K., Knutti, R. and Friedlingstein, P. 2009. Irreversible climate change due to carbon dioxide emissions. PNAS 106(6): 1704-1709. Irreversible climate change due to carbon dioxide emissions PNAS 106 1704 1709 Summary of Research Findings...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2019) 40 (1): 158–169.
Published: 01 January 2019
... the manual skills of the researcher and hence produce consistent welfare outcomes. Such systems generally use gases in a prescribed manner, but many of the recommended gases are anaesthetics and so their use is also strictly controlled under legislation. One gas that is not an anaesthetic, carbon dioxide...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 235–244.
Published: 14 October 2011
... and the outside air occurs by diffusion. No unifying theory has yet emerged to provide a satisfactory explanation for the apparently random distribution of hole-nesting and mound-nesting within the Crocodylidae. crocodilian incubation eggs oxygen consumption carbon dioxide production respiratory...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 229–234.
Published: 14 October 2011
... dioxide. Journal of Experimental Biology 175: 15-32. Allosteric control of oxygen binding by haemoglobin during embryonic development in the crocodile Crocodylus porosus: the role of red cell organic phosphates and carbon dioxide Journal of Experimental Biology 175 15 32 Jensen, F.B., Weber...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2012) 35 (4): 1011–1023.
Published: 29 January 2012
... industries. ocean acidification climate change Saccostrea glomerata Sydney rock oyster selective breeding spat genetic differences carbon dioxide aquaculture adaptation proteomics Bennett, C.A., Franklin, N.L. and 1954. Statistical analysis in chemistry and the chemical industry...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2015) 37 (3): 288–293.
Published: 14 April 2015
... the range of I holocyclus in order to better understand and mitigate public health risks. Ixodes holocyclus paralysis ticks ticks Ixodidae bandicoots Peramelidae Lyme diasease Adeyeye, O.A. and Butler, J.F. 1991. Field Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Baits for Sampling Ornithodoros...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2016) 38 (2): 257–260.
Published: 01 January 2016
... fellow). Coral-algal dynamics under future carbon dioxide scenarios and eutrophication. The member survey raised two issues relating to our publications: access to publications and time from Rowena Hamer (University of Tasmania, PhD student). submission to publication. In April 2015 our online...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (3): 329–374.
Published: 01 June 2017
... have the power to influence. Some opponents of taking action on climate change do so on the basis that increasing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will increase plant productivity, and that the climate change will be favourable to humans. The idea that increased carbon dioxide will have a fertiliser...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 617–626.
Published: 01 December 2018
... that could measure the proportion of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, a relatively new scientific topic at the time. He installed some instruments high up on Mauna Loa, a Hawaiian volcano and found that the annual average was 315 ppm. Once he had shown that carbon- dioxide levels were rising, he came under...
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/9780980327250
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-6-7
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2012) 36 (1): 5–19.
Published: 07 September 2012
... for wildlife will be disastrous for many species, and entire ecosystems, and the media have picked up on this point. Under the heading, Antarctic food chain threatened, Andrew Darby reported that: The predicted rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide will wreak havoc on krill, the tiny crustacean at the heart...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2019) 40 (1): 181–202.
Published: 01 January 2019
... yield of kangaroo carcass is high- Figure 12 Methane emissions expressed as carbon dioxide equivalents from kangaroos and conventional livestock. Australian Zoologist volume 40 (1) Professional kangaroo population control for animal welfare and conservation 2019 195 Theme Edition: Killing...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2004) 32 (4): 640–646.
Published: 01 December 2004
... Revolution that began in the 18th century, these deposits were safely stored underground (as coal, oil and natural gas) and the Earth's carbon was distributed in rough equilibrium in these deposits, in the soils and vegetation, in the oceans and as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The cycling of this carbon...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 884–887.
Published: 20 October 2011
... visited by each bee within a quadrat of 3m x 3m recorded. Bees were observed directly by the researcher from no more than 3m away. The time spent on each branch by each bee was estimated in seconds. Bee sampling A sweep net was used to collect five bees on each day. Bees were anaesthetised using carbon...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 128–145.
Published: 14 October 2011
... of Washington in Seattle to work on respiratory and cardiovascular physiology of lungfish. They generously included me in the work. In this photo, Kjell exposes blood vessels of an anaesthetized lungfish to allow implantation of cannulae to monitor blood pressure and take blood samples for oxygen and carbon...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (2): 173–180.
Published: 10 October 2011
... winter, allowing the bats to enter into periods of torpor, as a staging roost prior to females establishing a maternity roost elsewhere and it is potentially important for breeding in autumn. As the site shows signs of frequent visits by humans, is partly collapsed, and has a high likelihood of carbon...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 28 (1-4): 39–47.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... The key to animal life is autotrophy - the conversion of inorganic substances into organic. The most essential autotrophic process, as we all know, is photosynthesis - in which living organisms are able to use the energy of sunlight to convert inorganic material (carbon dioxide), into organic material...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 28 (1-4): 47–51.
Published: 17 March 2014
... material (carbon dioxide), into organic material. It occurs not only in plants but also in many bacteria. Algae, higher plants and some bacteria produce oxygen as a byproduct. Another, but less well known, autotrophic process is chemosynthesis, the production of organic matter from inorganic by means...