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connectivity and dispersive species

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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2016) 38 (1): 130–146.
Published: 01 January 2016
... of honeyeaters in the GWW differ morphologically, and in social and dispersive behaviour, but aggregate in multi-species flocks on blossoming eucalypts ( Eucalyptus spp.), the main source of nectar. There are differences among the species of honeyeaters in the eucalypts frequented as nectar sources...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 769–783.
Published: 01 December 2018
... areas for non-breeders, and act to draw dispersers towards another population and away from futile areas where individuals may be lost. Highly mobile species, such as birds, that can cross areas of unsuitable habitat are particularly suited to a stepping stone approach to increase connectivity within...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (2): 188–193.
Published: 01 January 2018
... vectors. Hilario et al. (2015) have reviewed planktonic larval durations (PLD) of 305 species representing seven phyla that show mean medium PLD of 27.68 (SD 28) days for shallow species and 96.63 (SD 85) days for deep water seabed species. The importance of such connectivity has been demonstrated...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (3): 414–423.
Published: 01 September 2018
.... Remnants of less than 20 ha had a low probability of occurrence regardless of proximity to other remnants and it was considered that fragmentation had probably disrupted dispersal of the species (Holland and Bennett 2009). On the far north coast, habitat connections between potoroo populations have been...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021)
Published: 18 August 2021
... and non-Eucalyptus species In urban and fragmented agricultural landscapes, are generally considered low-quality habitat for koalas resources (such as food trees, shelter, and mates) can in undisturbed native forest, in urban areas these trees be dispersed, and moving between areas can increase can...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 876–883.
Published: 20 October 2011
.... Science of Cane Toad Invasion and Control Alford, R.A., G. Brown, L. Schwarzkopf, B. Phillips and Shine, R. 2009. Comparisons through time and space suggest rapid evolution of dispersal behaviour in an invasive species. Wildlife Research 36: 23-28. Comparisons through time and space suggest rapid...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (2): 139–156.
Published: 05 June 2014
...L.C. Llewellyn A tagging and recapture program was carried out between 1959 and 1970 on large freshwater fish species in the Murrumbidgee and Murray Rivers to determine the patterns of their movement. Tagging was carried out at four main sites Stoney Crossing, Hattah, Hay and Narrandera...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (3): 351–376.
Published: 17 March 2014
... for the distribution of certain wild vertebrates is dispersal by ancient human agency through the aforementioned process of ethnophoresy. There is now a growing body of evidence that humans may have been both deliberately and unwittingly carrying species around with them earlier than previously thought (Flannery...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (2): 180–187.
Published: 17 March 2014
... that significant impact on the Yellow-bellied Glider was likely after addressing the “eight part test” under section 5A of the NSW Environmental Planning & Assessment Act (1979). The subsequent Species Impact Statement placed the impacts of the development into a regional context in respect to the distribution...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2012) 35 (4): 1005–1010.
Published: 29 January 2012
... to the instrumentalism that has occurred in human industries, in which animals and natural resources are deemed dispensable to human needs and wants. Instead we could embrace our connection with and dependence on the non-human world, learning to view other species as our planet s co-inhabitants, rather than...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2016) 38 (2): 161–170.
Published: 01 January 2016
... sections of a stream, or in adjacent slow flowing connected or isolated rock pools (Anstis 2002; Hunter 2007; DotE 2016). Studies by Hunter and Smith (2013) found a negative relationship between increasing canopy cover and the species occurrence, likely relating to thermoregulatory requirements impacting...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (2): 257–258.
Published: 17 March 2014
... the species, or in practical terms, the local popula- tion, has occupied through natural means and events. Many of the reasons humans value organisms in the first place arise from this connection. The evolutionary lineages, of which local populations are the cur~ently evolving tips, have two important...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 26 (3-4): 130–141.
Published: 17 March 2014
... resulting from stream siltation (Campbell and Doeg 1989). Impact on Species with Localized Habits Species most vulnerelble to roads and utility corridors me those with poor dispersal abilities, sedentary habitats, specialized needs and those endemic to an area. Califor- nia's unique vernal pools...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2012) 36 (2): 159–168.
Published: 12 December 2012
.... However, urban expanses may be difficult for such a small species to permeate, given the need for long flights across unsuitable habitat. We believe that the rapid urbanisation of the Sawtell hinterland could lead to reduced connectivity between the Boambee Creek catchment population...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (1990) 26 (2): 44–46.
Published: 01 June 1990
... happened at Mt Etna near Rockhampton in Queensland, and a major site at Pine Creek in the Northern Territory, in an abandoned gold mine, is at risk of collapse. This species requires urgent research, especially to determine whether there is a genetic connection between the populations that are centred...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (3): 297–302.
Published: 14 October 2011
... for research and publication of data regarding movement and dispersal in this species was identified. Key words: Litoria aurea, Green and Golden Bell Frog, Sydney Olympic Park, movement corridor, habitat corridor 298 October 2008AustralianZoologist volume 34 (3) and Wentworth Common, which contain a series...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021)
Published: 04 June 2021
... that serve to connect proximate habitat patches (Reed frogs, lizard eggs, invertebrates, and small mammals 2004; Mitchell et al. 2013). The ensuant isolation of have also been recorded (Shine 1987). Austrelaps species within these remnants can have a number of labialis is viviparous, producing an average...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (3): 334–349.
Published: 14 October 2011
... local population size and increases dispersal distance. Research that provides a more detailed understanding of habitat loss and fragmentation would greatly inform attempts to conserve and restore habitat of this species. Christy and Dickman (2002) investigated the tolerance of tadpoles to various...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 39 (1): 81–84.
Published: 01 December 2017
...Emily O'Gorman; Thom van Dooren ABSTRACT This paper explores the place of pest species in agricultural landscapes in Australia. Drawing on historical, ethnographic and philosophical research, we consider the very particular—reductive, utilitarian, monological—ways of understanding and valuing...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2015) 37 (4): 535–540.
Published: 01 September 2015
... that use them is important for species such as P. australis that generally occur in small, scattered populations and have limited dispersal ability. Acknowledgments We thank Adam Parsons and Barry Virtue for their assistance in the field. SCA funded part of the study and we thank that organisation...