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declining woodland birds

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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (4): 529–547.
Published: 01 June 2020
... of birds to logging of a small, relatively isolated woodland remnant in a landscape dominated by agriculture, with a focus on declining woodland birds. Approximately two thirds of a 120 ha cypress-eucalypt woodland remnant was selectively logged. Eighty bird species in total were recorded 2–3½ years after...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.020
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... used consistently by declining species. Many of the declining woodland birds, however, use the extensive Monarto plantations, suggesting that larger areas of reconstructed habitat are needed elsewhere in the region. Based on the habitat needed by pairs of some the declining species, minimum patch sizes...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2013) 36 (3): 332–348.
Published: 04 June 2013
... perspective from the northern plains, Victoria, Australia Pacific Conservation Biology 3 244 261 Bennett, A.F. and Watson, D.M. 2011. Declining woodland birds - is our science making a difference? Emu 111: i-vi. Declining woodland birds - is our science making a difference? Emu 111 i vi...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 675–697.
Published: 01 December 2018
...A.S.J. Saunders ABSTRACT Of the 59 woodland bird species investigated in this study, 20 were found to have declined over the last six decades while another 12 species were found to have increased over the same time period. Fifteen species are listed as threatened under the New South Wales...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (1): 29–39.
Published: 02 June 2014
...Murray Ellis; Jennifer Taylor Loss and fragmentation of the native vegetation of the Central Western Plains of New South Wales was followed by declines of woodland-dependent species. Drought is likely to have further suppressed many animal populations. Here we report on changes in woodland bird...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (4): 519–529.
Published: 17 March 2014
... and Crowley 2000). These declines are part of a general trend among the ground-feeding granivorous bird guild in tropical and subtropical rangelands (Franklin 1999). This conservation arena is likely to be as important as temperate woodlands for birds. Acknowledgements The surveys were funded by TransGrid...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2016) 38 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Harry F. Recher In this paper, I present data on the foraging behaviour of eucalypt forest and woodland birds at two sites on the Southern Tablelands of New South Wales during the non-breeding season (winter). The winter community was a subset of the summer community, with six guilds among 23...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (1): 37–77.
Published: 07 October 2011
... . This represents a greater proportion of declining bird species in NSW compared with the whole of Australia - one previous study found that 15% of 422 species had declined nationally. Of 139 woodland species tested, 33 (24%) were recorded less frequently during Atlas 2 , a similar proportion to the broader pattern...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (2): 206–224.
Published: 05 June 2014
..., there was less vegetative growth, and nectar production declined. As habitats became drier, fewer birds nested, although some bred and fledged young. Ground, shrub, and canopy foragers, including migrants, along with nectar-feeders declined in abundance. The numbers of raptors and cuckoos declined in line...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (2): 201–205.
Published: 16 September 2014
...: changes in reporting rates of birds in remnant woodland vegetation in the central wheatbelt of New South Wales, Australia, from drought to post-drought Australian Zoologist 37 29 39 Ford, H.A. 2011. The causes of decline of birds of eucalypt woodlands: advances in our knowledge over the last 10...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2012) 36 (1): 29–48.
Published: 07 September 2012
... species Monitoring Reserves Species richness Murray-Darling Depression Bioregion Bennett, A.F. and Watson, D.W. 2011. Declining woodland birds- is our science making a difference? Emu, 111 (1): i-vi. Declining woodland birds- is our science making a difference? Emu 111 i vi...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 71–81.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... The woodland and open woodland habitats in the study area were the most important for these species, and it is noteworthy that a number were found to be common residents of the study area. Woodland-dependent bird species, including many of those listed above, are in serious decline in agricultural regions...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 633–648.
Published: 20 October 2011
... at multiple scales: reptiles in an Australian grazing landscape Journal of Applied Ecology 41 32 44 Ford, H.A., Barrett, G.W., Saunders, D.A. and Recher, H.F. 2001. Why have birds in the woodlands of Southern Australia declined? Biological Conservation 97: 71-88. Why have birds in the woodlands...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2004) 32 (4): 508–542.
Published: 01 December 2004
... been undertaken. Two week-long surveys were conducted per year between 1997 and 2002 for each of 31 survey sites comprising 15 regional ecosystems. Survey methods at each site included pitfall-traps, Elliott and cage traps, reptile searches, and one-hectare bird counts. Incidental data were also...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (3): 316–324.
Published: 17 March 2014
...Cameron Webb; Jean Joss Gambusia holbrooki is a small, aggressive fish introduced into Australia in 1925 to control mosquitoes. It has been suggested that this species may also prey on tadpoles and be a contributing factor in the decline of some Australian frog populations. We examined...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2016) 38 (1): 130–146.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Harry F. Recher; Mike C. Calver; William E. Davis, Jr. Nectar-feeding birds are commonly the most abundant birds in Australian eucalypt forests and woodlands, where they play a key role as pollinators of native plants. Among the nectar-feeders, honeyeaters (Meliphagidae) are particularly aggressive...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2004) 32 (4): 605–628.
Published: 01 December 2004
... in a reexamination of the temporal and spatial patterns of decline of these mammals. Shortridge collected a monotreme, 25 species of marsupial, 10 species of bat, 8 species of rodent, as well as rabbits and dingoes (a total of 46 species). He collected in five broad regions: mesic woodland sites in what is now...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 92–109.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... We conclude that the data are consistent with the hypothesis that the Gouldian Finch suffered a major population decline in the Kimberley area in the late 1970s. We also discuss a range of “sustainable conservation” issues related to the harvest of wild birds for the avicultural trade and suggest...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 210–224.
Published: 17 March 2014
... preferences and weigh between 10 g and 1.5 kg. Mammals still common in State Forests of the region are generally mature woodland (tree and log dependent) or shrubby understorey species over 1 kg. Patterns of cultural disturbance are compared to these trends. Extinction Species decline Habitat...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021)
Published: 12 July 2021
... Lorikeet 9 5 Willie Wagtail 1 1 Yellow-throated 9 6 1 Scrubwren 3 1 5 1 2021 AuZstoraolilaongist K Daly systematic surveys. The four most frequently detected Species have declined for a number of reasons. Those birds (presence per surveys) were the Lewins Honeyeater, that normally inhabit woodland...