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declining woodland birds

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Journal Articles
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
10.7882/FS.2004.020
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... used consistently by declining species. Many of the declining woodland birds, however, use the extensive Monarto plantations, suggesting that larger areas of reconstructed habitat are needed elsewhere in the region. Based on the habitat needed by pairs of some the declining species, minimum patch sizes...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (4): 519–529.
Published: 17 March 2014
... Biology 5: 224-239. Habitat of the Regent Honeyeater Xanthomyza phrygia and the value of the Bundarra-Barraba region for the conservation of avifauna Pacific Conservation Biology 5 224 239 Reid, J. 1999. Threatened and Declining Woodland Birds in the New South Wales Sheep-Wheat Belt: I...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (3): 770–810.
Published: 16 March 2022
... benefitted Noisy Miners and exacerbated declines in woodland-dependent small birds. Noisy Miner Manorina melanocephala environmental history overabundant natives landscape transformation Native to Nemesis: a cultural and environmental history of the Noisy Miner 1788 - 2019 Richard Beggs Fenner...
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Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (2): 206–224.
Published: 05 June 2014
... Victoria resulted in all categories (guilds based on foraging, nesting habits, relative mobility, habitat, and distribution or range) of woodland birds declining in abundance. This was attributed to the reduced abundance of arthropods and nectar as a consequence of the lack of rain. Burbidge and Fuller...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (2): 608–630.
Published: 18 August 2022
... in the nearby WNP, surveyed from 2004 to 2019, yielding data on 7 years post-fire for both areas. In previous contributions, we evaluated the role of drought in driving woodland bird declines, noting particular sensitivity of resident insectivores and ground-nesting species (Stevens and Watson 2013). Monitoring...
Journal Articles
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1994
10.7882/RZSNSW.1994.012
EISBN: 0-9599951-9-6
... and, for some species, reduced prey populations) are implicated in the major declines and these have been more evenly distributed in relation to climatic zones and vegetation types. Marked features of the decreasers are an over-representation of Australian endemics, residents, woodland and scrub birds, tree...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2013) 36 (2): 209–228.
Published: 07 February 2013
... Macrotis lagotis (Blakers et al. 1984; Ashby et al. 1990). Many other species are declining and/or dependent on the remaining remnants of the original vegetation. A suite of declining woodland birds includes the Emu Dromaius novaehollandiae, Superb Parrot Polytelis swainsonii, Hooded Robin Melanodryas...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 29 (1-2): 3–41.
Published: 17 March 2014
... the fauna of the grassy woodlands on the Cumberland Plain and Southern Tablelands. The most significant impacts followed the clearing and fragmentation of the vegetation for agriculture. Changed fire regimes, the naturalization of exotic plants and animals, and disease were also factors in the decline...
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Journal Articles
Journal Articles
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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (3): 1–847.
Published: 22 November 2022
... in the post-war period. Such broadscale habitat modification has both benefitted Noisy Miners and exacerbated declines in woodland-dependent small birds. ABSTRACT Key words: Noisy Miner, Manorina melanocephala, environmental history, overabundant natives, landscape transformation Published: 16 March 2022 DOI...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 71–81.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... The woodland and open woodland habitats in the study area were the most important for these species, and it is noteworthy that a number were found to be common residents of the study area. Woodland-dependent bird species, including many of those listed above, are in serious decline in agricultural regions...