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dieback

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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (1): 69–99.
Published: 17 March 2014
... fluctuations are interpreted in terms of herbivore irruption theory. We suggest that koala population expansion was a response to an increase in food availability (possibly due to the development of regrowth vegetation and/or waves of dieback) resulting from land development patterns. A subsequent decline...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 26 (3-4): 109–129.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... haemastoma , and Swamp Mahogany, E robusta . These food trees occur in low densities in the reserves compared with their former densities elsewhere on the Peninsula. The reserves have also suffered extensive eucalypt dieback associated with urban runoff, and their eucalypt communities are threatened...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2007.019
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-1-2
... and political activity to appease farmers. Recommended management strategies arising from a Parliamentary inquiry are contrasted with the politically influenced reality. Noisy Miners Manorina melanocephala contribute to dieback in eucalypts by aggressive exclusion of smaller insectivorous birds. Management...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1991
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1991.015
EISBN: 0-9599951-5-3
... remain poorly understood. Most research in the Darling District has been directed to disturbance ecology including mining, logging, fire and plant disease. Rehabilitation following bauxite mining and the dynamics and management of dieback disease caused by Phytophthora dnnamomi in the jarrah forest...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (1): 29–39.
Published: 02 June 2014
.... and Reilly, P.N. 1984.The Atlas of Australian birds. Melbourne University Press, Melbourne. The Atlas of Australian birds Brouwers, N., Matusick, G., Ruthrof, K., Lyons, T. and Hardy, G. 2013. Landscape-scale assessment of tree crown dieback following extreme drought and heat in a Mediterranean...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2012) 35 (4): 983–990.
Published: 29 January 2012
... with climate variables Plant Ecology 45 127 39 Cunningham, S.C., Thomson, J.R., Read, J., Baker, P.J. and Nally, R.M. 2010. Does stand structure influence susceptibility of eucalypt floodplain forests to dieback? Austral Ecology 35: 348-356. Does stand structure influence susceptibility...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (1): 48–56.
Published: 17 March 2014
... and toad populations. Wisconsin Dept. Nat. Resources. Nichols, O. G. and Barnford, M. J., 1985. Reptile and frog utilization of rehabilitated bauxite mine sites and dieback-affecred sites in Western Australia's jarrah Eucalyptus marginata forest. Biol. Conserv. 34: 227-49. Reptile and frog...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2012) 36 (1): 120–124.
Published: 07 September 2012
... to the local extirpation of huge colonies of Providence Petrel P. solandri in the 19th Century (Christian 2005) resulting in the subsequent loss of 70 tons of guano deposited annually (Richard Holdaway unpublished data). The decline in forest health is manifest through dieback in the dominant Norfolk Island...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (1990) 26 (2): 101–107.
Published: 01 June 1990
..., such as from land clearing, intensive logging, altered fire regimes, pollution, tree dieback and continu- ing fragmentation of the various habitats. He also believes that fellow scientists who have found the same patterns of change leading to loss should raise their voice in well-argued protest. Recher goes...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (3): 345–358.
Published: 17 March 2014
... diminished in importance by 1981-2000. Gordon and Hrdina (2005) discuss possible causes of these population changes during the harvest period. It is difficult to separate the effect of harvesting from that of other factors such as changes in vegetation due to clearing and dieback. However, Gordon and Hrdina...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021)
Published: 12 July 2021
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2016) 38 (1): 130–146.
Published: 01 January 2016
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (4): 518–536.
Published: 01 September 2017
... previously burned by Aboriginal people, but left unmanaged after their displacement some years before (Ellender 2002). Additionally, localised tree dieback was attributed, by Howitt (1890), to the cessation of firing by Aboriginal people resulting in an increase in insect populations and insect attack. Early...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (1): 40–74.
Published: 02 June 2014
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/9780958608589
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/9780958608572
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1991
DOI: 10.7882/CAFF.1991
EISBN: 0-9599951-5-3
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1992
DOI: 10.7882/ZIC.1992
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 0001
DOI: 10.7882/AZR1.1989
EISBN: 978-0-9599951-1-4
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.7882/9780980327212
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-1-2