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dispersal ability

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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (2): 199–207.
Published: 17 March 2014
... along the coast and hinterland. The species is usually associated with stationary water bodies, mostly permanent, in both forested and cleared habitats. The species has also been found in a range of terrestrial habitats, often considerable distances from waterbodies; suggesting a high dispersive ability...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (4): 563–598.
Published: 17 March 2014
... in disturbed or newly created sites, high fecundity and high dispersal ability. However, unlike many “colonizing” species that are very common, L. aurea is considered to be endangered. Though the decline of L. aurea is continuing as a result of ongoing threats, it should be possible to promote some recovery...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.060
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... The effective management of the Grey-headed Flying-fox Pteropus poliocephalus as a threatened species in NSW will depend on our ability to develop and implement policies that focus on habitat conservation and enhancement. The aim is to preserve a continuous food supply for the species...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022)
Published: 13 July 2022
...-lethal effects on fecundity and fitness related to reduction of food sources. Vulnerability to fire and the ability of a species to survive in and recolonise the post-fire ecosystem, are influenced by life history and ecological traits (Moretti and Legg 2006; Moretti et al. 2010). Low dispersing taxa...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (1): 76–84.
Published: 02 June 2014
... for the climate change threat to Lepidoptera and other insects. Journal of Insect Conservation 15: 259-68. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10841-010-9342-y Wood, B. C. and Pullin, A. S. 2002. Persistence of species in a fragmented urban landscape: the importance of dispersal ability and habitat availability...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (2): 246–251.
Published: 17 March 2014
... Megalurus gramineus has successfully colonised artesian bores in the arid inland (Blakers et al. 1984) implying dispersal ability. Limited data in Ford and Parker (1974) and Higgins et al. (2001) indicate absolute wing lengths of Spinifexbirds (51-53.5 mm) to be longer than those of fairy-wrens (e.g...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2015) 37 (4): 535–540.
Published: 01 September 2015
... low dispersal abilities (Thumm and Mahony 1999). No animals have been observed crossing sealed roads (Daly pers. obs.; Thumm pers. comm.) and many populations within the Sydney basin are in decline or have become locally extinct as a result of direct and indirect impacts of urban development (Jacobson...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (3): 469–479.
Published: 01 September 2018
... variables such as nutrients and turbidity tend to increase in post-fire period (first year after fire), relative to those in pre-fire period (Smith et al. 2011). The effects of fire on aquatic organisms may depend on their mobility and dispersal ability but lasting detrimental effects are thought...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 876–883.
Published: 20 October 2011
.... This accelerated dispersal ability has been attributed to the rapid spatial selection at the invasion front (Phillips et al. 2008b) that may drive the evolution of morphological traits that favour increased locomotor performance (Phillips et al. 2006). This raises the question, are toads in southern regions also...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (3): 414–423.
Published: 01 September 2018
...-term persistence of many Australian native species. These urban-sensitive species that are unable to persist in urban landscapes are often characterised by specialised dietary requirements and limited dispersal ability (Garden et al. 2006). When these specialised species are lost, the functional...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 26 (3-4): 130–141.
Published: 17 March 2014
... dispersal abilities, sedentary habitats, specialized needs and those endemic to an area. Califor- nia's unique vernal pools with their specialized endemiC species have surrered through road construction, The rare Santa Cruz long-toed salamander Ambystoma mac- rodacty/um croceum is threatened by a highway...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (3): 351–376.
Published: 17 March 2014
... in watercraft as pets or for food, trade or ceremonial purposes; (6) island assemblages of vertebrates that favour human-associated species over natural dispersal ability; and (7) direct written or oral historical records of translocation. In the face of the potential ambiguity of single strands of evidence...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (3): 458–467.
Published: 17 March 2014
... and south (Nix and Switzer 1991). Unlike many non-volant mammals, and in particular the rainforest endemic species, the distribution of M. flonum traverses virtually the entire geographic range of the region. This potentially may be a function of flight and the ability to disperse through non-rainforest...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022)
Published: 10 May 2022
... of legal shooting of flying-foxes. The need to address community concerns about flying-fox camps in populated areas led to the development of the Flying-fox Camp Management Policy and funds to support land managers to implement policy actions. Dispersing camps has been largely ineffective in the long-term...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 124–138.
Published: 01 October 2020
... into neighbouring residential, recreational and industrial areas. Prior to this, impacts had been mitigated through vegetation clearing to create buffer zones and residential subsidies for mitigation equipment and services. The influx warranted additional measures such as a dispersal program and further vegetation...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 769–783.
Published: 01 December 2018
... such as dispersal may cause the loss of certain demographic stages if compensatory immigration no longer occurs. Social interactions that facilitate mate pairing can become rare, reducing the likelihood of successful breeding pairs establishing. Against a backdrop of habitat loss and degradation, these factors may...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022)
Published: 20 May 2022
... tolerances to be typically narrow. Along with having limited dispersal capacity, frogs thus predominantly achieve protection from extreme conditions through behavioural means, such as their choice of refuge. We distinguish between macro-refugia, which are landscape-scale topographic features that in part B...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022)
Published: 02 March 2022
... and cohesion in the development of a management approach. This included sharing information on effectiveness of management actions at other camps, including dispersal attempts, to encourage residents to think more broadly about management options that would meet their needs. Conflicts between residents...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (2): 190–202.
Published: 10 October 2011
... 2003). Consequently, higher temperatures may have different distributional implications for different latitudes and for taxa with different dispersive abilities. While some ecosystems have already experienced substantial temperature-related changes (Walther et al. 2002; Hughes 2003), Brown...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021)
Published: 02 September 2021
... and herbivores (Barthelmess and in, and killed by AVCs during the breeding season Brooks 2010). Moreover, solitary mammals (e.g. wombats, (Dique et al. 2003; Taylor and Goldingay 2004; Sullivan Roger et al. 2012), are more likely to be killed through et al. 2013) as they disperse, defend their home AVCs than...