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domestic cats

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Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.094
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
... While it is undeniable that both feral cats and owned domestic cats prey on native wildlife, evidence that this is a threat to the viability of wildlife populations is contentious, particularly in the suburbs. Where uncertainty is great or the risks are high, the precautionary principle...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (3): 406–409.
Published: 17 March 2014
...-nosed Bandicoot Perameles nasuta. Introduced predators recorded within the park include the domestic dog (including roaming pets and feral individuals), Red Fox and Cat Felis catus. Experimental design Twenty independent small mammal trapping transects (>400m apart) were established during February 2003...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (3): 513–519.
Published: 01 September 2018
... of predators (domestic cats and foxes) at all sites. Rats rapidly investigated the log piles (mean time to first rat observation ± SE: 27.25 ± 14.34 days), but were only recorded intermittently over the monitoring period, suggesting that they did not permanently inhabit the sites. Our results suggest...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 826–842.
Published: 20 October 2011
... the existence of this phenomenon and reports accounts from historical literature and from interviews with early rural residents of the region being: Twenty-six historical accounts of the poisoning of domestic cats ( Felis catus ) and dogs ( Canis lupus familiaris ) through consumption of the bones ( n =11...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2010
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2010.032
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-3-6
... peak hour traffic, although they often did not come out to forage for a whole night, or only foraged for a few hours within a night. We suggest that this might be a form of predator avoidance behaviour since feral and domestic cats were common in the area, and/or that they are able to obtain sufficient...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2019) 40 (1): 41–48.
Published: 01 January 2019
... of a name. The last question is down the front here. NICOLA HARROD (University of Canberra): I have two questions for Sebastian. The first one was that you said you re talking about feral cats and not domestic cats. Aren t there problems from the domestic cats too, and won t your control efforts impact...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 649–654.
Published: 20 October 2011
... of Veterinary Internal Medicine 11 361 364 Clark, P. (ed.) 2004. Haematology of Australian mammals. CSIRO Publishing, Collingwood Victoria, Australia. Haematology of Australian mammals Graham, LH., Swanson, WF. And Brown, LJ. 2000. Chronic gonadotrophin administration in domestic cats causes...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2012) 35 (4): 991–995.
Published: 29 January 2012
... at Heirisson Prong and on the effects of mine site rehabilitation on cockatoos, and has led an intriguing series of studies on the effects of domestic cats on wildlife that have focused both on people s attitudes to the marauding behaviour of their pets and on novel ways that we can try to mitigate the damage...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020)
Published: 07 July 2020
.... 2012, Pongracz et al. 2017) and between the domestic cat (Felis catus) and European/Scottish wildcat (Felis silvestris) (Beaumont et al. 2001, Hertwig et al. 2009, Macdonald et al. 2010, Tiesmeyer et al. 2020). Introgression has also shaped the genome of humans (Homo sapiens), with extensive...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (4): 533–562.
Published: 17 March 2014
..., if not altogether, extinct. Disease has also played a great part in the extermination. The native bear died in thousands from a disease which produced a great bony growth on their heads. A mysterious disease also spread through the ranks of the native cat Dasyurus viverrinus, the domestic cat also played a great...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2007.025
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-1-2
... ), but also exert indirect negative and indirect positive effects on four species of insular skinks. In the second case study, high levels of activity of domestic house cats ( Felis catus ) in suburban bushland in Sydney are associated with reduced richness of bird species. However, high cat activity also...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 39 (1): 85–102.
Published: 01 December 2017
... to the natural conditions found on Lanai, an island south of Hawai i. In the same paper, the author also commented on the feral domestic cats of the island, although no more details were given about their situation (Svihla 1936). In both cases, the individuals were feral because they were domestic species...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (2): 248–256.
Published: 17 March 2014
... factors that have not been identified. Van de Mortel and Buttemer (1996) provide compelling evidence that UV-B radiation is not responsible. One possible threat to the recovery of L. aurea is predation by cats and foxes. Domestic cats are known to feed on frogs (Paton 1990) and given the location of many...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (3): 420–430.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... Bioscience 51: 15-24. Frontiers in ecology Bioscience 51 15 24 Turner, D.C. and Bateson, P. 2000. The domestic cat: the biology of its behaviour. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. The domestic cat: the biology of its behaviour Ulanowicz, R.E. 1997.Ecology, the ascendent perspective...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2004) 32 (4): 605–628.
Published: 01 December 2004
... . Shortridge speculated that disease, predation by feral cats Felis catus , competition from house mice Mus musculus , and bushfires were major factors in overall decline, and the impact of closer settlement was important in localised declines. These, and other factors commonly cited as reasons for mammal...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (2): 365–375.
Published: 17 March 2014
... of handling. DISCUSSION In this survey, opinions were sought from scientists, zookeepers and wildlife carers on Toblc I . Relative favourability o f quolls compared to domestic pets of similar body size (90% of respondents compared quolls to domestic cats). Score: 5 = Very favourable, 4 = Favourable, 3...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021)
Published: 22 April 2021
... species cats rabbits swamp wallabies spotted-tailed quolls domestic dogs community-based surveys koalas meso-predator release scalp returns 2021 A Combining cameras and citizen science to define the distribution and behaviour of dingoes and foxes in New South Wales Daniel Lunney1,2,3, Indrie...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (4): 530–561.
Published: 17 March 2014
... cats as secondary factors. Much of the decline occurred before food shortages or habitat destruction caused by sheep grazing, habitat destruction caused by wheat farming, and changes in Aboriginal fire regimes. Dated and localised records of disease affecting conspicuous (often pest) species, when...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (1): 108–118.
Published: 17 March 2014
... opportunities, and are considered by many as an enriching part of the New Zealand landscape. However, exotic mammals are also responsible for significant ecological and economic damage, and are often the focus of intensive, sustained and costly control efforts. In economic terms, many domesticated mammal...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (4): 548–564.
Published: 01 June 2020
... on issues relating to domesticated animals, particularly dogs and cats (Wirth 2016). A key issue is impulse purchasing, which does not necessarily carry a commitment to care for the animal over the course of its lifespan. While dog and cat lifespans are generally limited to 15 years, 2014 2015 2016 2017...