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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (3): 457–463.
Published: 01 June 2017
... © 2017 Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales 2017 Conservation dingo economic human-wildlife dimensions perceptions rabies domestic dog 2017 457 Australian Zoologist volume 38 (3) This paper is part of the theme edition of Australian Zoologist - Dangerous Ideas in Zoology...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 24 (1): 73–80.
Published: 17 March 2014
... Management Forum — A Brief Review. Koolewong 12(3): 4-7. South Australian Kangaroo Management Forum — A Brief Review Koolewong 12 4 7 GRIGG, G. C., 1987. A New View of the 'Roo. Aust. Nat Hist. (June issue). 'I - a better economic base r - for our marginal grazing lands? An address by Gordon...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.036
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1998
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1998c.010
EISBN: 0-9586085-0-4
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1991
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1991.004
EISBN: 0-9599951-5-3
... This chapter reviews recent developments in the economics of the environment with special reference to forest fauna. While economics can make a substantial contribution to broad land-use decisions, it is less useful in day-to-day management decisions. Efficient allocation of resources...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1991
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1991.027
EISBN: 0-9599951-5-3
... A bright green, socially just, high economic growth scenario is one of a number that are being developed to illustrate how forestry might be pursued within the context of ecologically sustainable development. The directions described in this scenario are hypothetical and are intended to provoke...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 39 (1): 43–51.
Published: 01 December 2017
...Carolynn L. Smith ABSTRACT Humans began the transformation of wild jungle fowl into modern day chickens over 8,000 years ago. Over the past 70 years, chickens have become an increasingly important economic and dietary stable throughout the world. There are now over 20 billion chickens on farms...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.030
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-8-1
... Wildlife research has few immediate economic consequences, and over the last 10-20 years has collapsed as a serious research program within Australia's premier research organization, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO). In spite of great public support...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.038
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... million per year. Exclusion netting has proven to be the most effective method of protecting fruit crops from flying-foxes. However, concerns regarding the economic viability of netting have prevented its use in areas where market returns are relatively low, such as the Camden district of NSW. To test...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2007.031
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-1-2
... Pests are species that, when they become overabundant, have unacceptable effects on humans. Ironically, humans themselves have greatly increased their abundance in the last century. Although this increase, together with concomitant scientific and economic growth, has brought many benefits...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1999
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1999.033
EISBN: 0-9586085-1-2
... then, an appreciation of the high diversity of the phylum in Australasian waters has emerged, with 932 Australian and 857 New Zealand described and known undescribed species listed for these countries’ respective Exclusive Economic Zones. Since the continental shelves of both countries, especially those of Western...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.092
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
... The Silver Gull population in the Greater Melbourne Area has expanded dramatically in response to the availability of abundant anthropogenic foods. The activities of large numbers of gulls lead to a range of conflicts with human interests. These conflicts and examples of their economic costs...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.003
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-3-4
... and rural Australia is struggling with deepening cultural/economic crises about long-term viability. The perspective from deep time suggests that our current limited range of strategies for solving these crises, including reliance on the effectiveness of protected areas, will ultimately fail—sometimes...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2007.014
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-1-2
... environmental or socio-economic impacts in Australia until quite recently. There are long-standing wild populations in several states that have been managed for many years as a valuable resource for hunting rather than as a pest. In very recent times a perception has developed that wild deer numbers...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.004
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-3-4
.... Taking body weights into account the factor should be about 0.4 and, taking measurements of field metabolic rate into account, may be as low as 0.15-0.2. Hence, even if the desired reductions in kangaroos could be achieved, there would be little or no difference to the economic viability of woolgrowers...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2013
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2013.004
EISBN: 978-0-9874309-1-5
... consumption of resources. Humanity needs to share Earth with all other species regardless of those species economic benefits or costs. ...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2003.007
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-6-5
... of information to enhance members' understanding of the causal link between decisions and environmental outcomes and the incorporation of environmental costs and benefits in socio-economic evaluations of water use in coastal NSW. ...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.047
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-8-1
... In recent decades there has been a major shift in Australian government policies associated with universities. These reforms have been focused largely on reducing the economic dependence of universities on government. In parallel with these reforms, there has been increasing pressure...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2007.038
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-0-5
..., the Dreaming track system can be seen as a social and economic institution which provided an adequate supply of resources for Aboriginal people and was an alternative for the adoption of horticulture in Australia. ...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 160–165.
Published: 14 October 2011
...-yield harvesting, it has proven difficult to exploit wildlife populations sustainably. Economic and social factors often conspire to take yields that cannot be maintained leading to many examples of overexploitation (Ludwig et al. 1993; Ludwig 2001). In Australia, examples include overharvest of whale...