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elapid

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Journal Articles
Book Chapter
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (3): 811–815.
Published: 20 April 2022
... anurophagous elapids. A feeding observation in a free-ranging Grey Snake Hemiaspis damelii (Günther 1876) in the Murrumbidgee catchment, southern NSW 1Damian R. Michael, Talia Schlen2 and Dana Lanceman3 1Gulbali Institute, Charles Sturt University, Albury, 2640 NSW, Australia. 2School of Agricultural...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2023) 43 (1): 79–94.
Published: 27 February 2023
... from active searching). Our results indicated that different methods were more appropriate depending on taxa (i.e., pitfall trapping for terrestrial skinks, funnel traps for Elapids), its habit (i.e., pitfalls or active searching for fossorial species, active searching for arboreal species) or rarity...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (4): 731–737.
Published: 28 December 2020
... macra 1 0.05 Blindsnake Robust Blind Snake Anilios ligatus 1 0.05 Python Python Children s Python Black-headed Python Antaresia childreni Aspidites melanocephalus 3 3 0.14 0.14 Elapid Top End Death Adder Acanthophis rugosus 34 1.62 Elapid Northern Shovel-nosed Snake Brachyurophis roperi 2 0.10 Elapid...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (4): 610–617.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... Similar divergences between mainland and island populations have been reported in other snake species, suggesting that these peripheral populations represent a significant component of the overall ecological and morphological variation within each taxon. elapid food habits island reproduction...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2023) 43 (1): 95–96.
Published: 12 April 2023
... consumed only by burrowing blindsnakes (Typhlopidae) that consume ant larvae, and aquatic (mangrove-dwelling) homalopsines that consume crabs and other crustaceans (Shine 1995). Among the terrestrial and arboreal Australian snakes (i.e., elapids and colubrids), grasshoppers and crickets are occasional prey...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 25 (3): 65–67.
Published: 17 March 2014
...Richard Shine; Mark Fitzgerald This small elapid snake is endangered because of its restriction to a specific habitat (weathered sandstone outcrops in southeastem Australia) that is under heavy pressure for commercial exploitation, especially for “bushrock” in suburban gardens. We review...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2013) 36 (2): 145–152.
Published: 07 February 2013
..., the python Aspidites ramsayi (Macleay, 1882) and the elapid snake Diemenia ferox Macleay, 1882, now Oxyuranus microlepidotus (McCoy, 1878). The type locality of the two snakes is corrected from “near Fort Bourke” to James Ramsay's then property Tyndayrey. Further evidence is provided for a link between...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2010
10.7882/FS.2010.015
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-3-6
... At the time of European settlement, the terrestrial reptile fauna of the Sydney metropolitan area, west and north to the Hawkesbury-Nepean River, consisted of 45 species, based on Australian Museum records, although most regions had between 30-36 species. Skinks and elapid snakes dominated...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 283–290.
Published: 14 October 2011
... 21 Lazell, B. 2007. Captive husbandry and breeding of the Pale-headed Snake Hoplocephalus bitorquatus. Reptiles Australia 3: 6-12. Captive husbandry and breeding of the Pale-headed Snake Hoplocephalus bitorquatus Reptiles Australia 3 6 12 Longmore, R. 1986. Atlas of Elapid Snakes...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1993
10.7882/RZSNSW.1993.054
EISBN: 0-9599951-8-8
... Ingram’s Brown Snake is the least well known member of the elapid genus Pseudonaja. Recent field work undertaken in southwestern Queensland has extended the known geographic range for the species. Aspects of the morphology and ecology of Ingram’s Brown Snake suggest that it shares much...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021) 41 (4): 753–760.
Published: 04 June 2021
... habitat if it has survived the impacts of wildfire. Key words: Adelaide Mount Lofty Ranges, Lobethal Bushland Park, elapid, endemic, reptile, snake, wildfire DOI: httpsdoi.org/10.7882/AZ.2021.013 Introduction Habitat fragmentation is often a part of progressive habitat decline. This includes the gradual...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2015) 37 (4): 485–491.
Published: 01 September 2015
... from the same 25km of trench in the 7 days before & 7 days after the fire. Swan & Wilson 488 2015AustralianZoologist volume 37 (4) However five species (the skinks Ctenotus regius and Eremiascincus phantasmus; the varanid lizard Varanus gouldii and the elapid snakes Suta suta and Pseudechis australis...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2004) 32 (4): 633–639.
Published: 01 December 2004
... in 1967, a few years previously Australian Reptiles in Colour", Reed Books). It provided a brief summary of the biology and diversity of Australian reptiles. I was particularly struck by a single sentence in the section on elapid snakes on page 92 , "up to the present time no species of elapid snake has...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021) 42 (3): 699–701.
Published: 29 October 2021
... reported in wild reptiles, and even less in viviparous species (DeNardo 2006). Western Tiger Snakes (Notechis scutatus occidentalis) are ~1m viviparous elapids that are commonly found around wetlands of South-West Western Australia. In Perth, Western Australia, tiger snakes persist in several wetlands...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (4): 652–655.
Published: 01 June 2020
...). This record is listed as 90393-035 in relatively small elapid (mean snout vent length = 42.6 cm, the BioNet Atlas of NSW Wildlife (NSW Bionet 2019). max = 60 cm) (Shine 1987) found across central inland Another specimen (Australian Museum catalog number - NSW, extending north through the interior of south...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 28 (1-4): 52–54.
Published: 17 March 2014
...: Canberra. Zoological Catalogue of Australian. Mammalia 128 45 NIX, H., 1986. A biogeographic analysis of Australian elapid snakes. Pp. 4-15 in Atlas of Elaptid Snakes of Australia ed by R. Longmore. Australian Government Publishing Service: Canberra. Atlas of Elaptid Snakes of Australia 4 15...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021) 41 (2): fmclv–fmclviii.
Published: 09 April 2021
... Observations of an aggregation between two species of Australian elapid snakes: the threatened Little Whip Snake Parasuta flagellum and Common Eastern Brown Snake Pseudonaja textilis Nicole A. Hansen and Damon L. Oliver 179 Corporate support for threatened species recovery efforts: three case studies from...