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extreme climate

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Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.016
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-6-7
..., in which case each species will respond directly to environmental factors; 2) dependent upon a set of biological interactions among species; or 3) of a combination of both environmental and biological factors. Our second point is that climate extremes will drive substantial change beyond any changes...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (4): 467–479.
Published: 17 March 2014
... activity and species richness was also low in forests typical of the most extreme climate (Snow Gum/Black Sallee), however no differences were found between forests with other floristic associations. Structural complexity appeared more important. as it was related to greater activity levels and higher...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 658–668.
Published: 01 December 2018
... these features at a local landscape scale. Long-term banding data also revealed negligible effects of weather extremes on survival and we suggest our high elevation study site represented a climate refuge that buffered bats from the effects of weather extremes. No single technique provides all the answers to bat...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.022
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-6-7
... Koalas are prime candidates to study the impact of climate change because they are specialised folivores and lack any ready means of avoiding weather extremes. Koalas are widely but patchily distributed throughout eastern mainland Australia. Efforts to protect them from landscape-scale threats...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.012
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-6-7
... Coral reef ecosystems are particularly vulnerable to global climate change, owing to extreme environmental sensitivities and consequent bleaching of reef-building scleractinian corals. Severe coral bleaching often kills scleractinian coral, leading to longer-term declines in habitat...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.014
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-6-7
... Climate change is an extremely important issue, and even if action to address it occurs now, environmental changes already in train have the potential to have considerable impacts on biodiversity. If action is delayed the inevitable impacts will be greater. However, while our politicians...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.020
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-6-7
... will put 22% of Nature Reserves, 39% of National Parks and 50% of wetlands at very high risk of inundation. In response to this and the additive effect of extreme events and other aspects of climate change, species will need to adapt, move or they will die out locally. Movement of species to track changing...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.019
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-6-7
... species in most areas, however, freshwater turtles, despite extremely high nest predation from foxes, remain among the highest biomass of any vertebrate in the ecosystem. The secret is their resilience through adaptive changes of a life history pattern that is strongly density dependent, however...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 369–377.
Published: 14 October 2011
... extremes. In such environments, the frequency, intensity and duration of extreme temperatures, drought and humidity determine survivorship by influencing environmental water availability, metabolic water balance, temperature regulation and foliage availability (Specht and Specht 2002). Climate change...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (2): 190–202.
Published: 10 October 2011
... protection as part of ecologically sustainable development (ESD). Moreover, the management of beaches and linked adjacent ecosystems is becoming increasingly important because of their vulnerability to burgeoning human pressures including climate change. Although there are large uncertainties involved, some...
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/9780980327250
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-6-7
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.054
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-8-1
... religious groups that are hostile to science, a political or commercial stance that sees short-term gains in rejecting or undermining science, or a non-zoological understanding of animals that arrives at a philosophical position opposed to the study and management of wild animals. The extreme ‘animal rights...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (2): 209–221.
Published: 10 October 2011
... to threatening processes. Its apparent preference for high elevation sites also suggests that it may be adversely affected by future climate change. Hence, we recommend that the species be nominated for listing as ‘endangered’ in Queensland. Targeted field studies are needed to more fully document...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (2): 206–224.
Published: 05 June 2014
... to an extreme climatic event. Oecologia 142: 398-406. Avian reproductive failure in response to an extreme climatic event Oecologia 142 398 406 Burbidge, A.A. and Fuller, P.J. 2007. Gibson Desert birds: Response to drought and plenty. Emu 107: 126-134. Gibson Desert birds: Response to drought...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (2): 234–237.
Published: 28 October 2014
.... The diet of the rufous owl Ninox rufa near Cooinda in the Northern Territory Emu 85 202 205 Greenville, A.C., Wardle, G.M., Dickman, C.R. 2012. Extreme climatic events drive mammal irruptions: regression analysis of 100-year trends in desert rainfall and temperature. Ecology and Evolution 2: 2645...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 646–657.
Published: 01 December 2018
... relationship between productivity and plant species richness. Science 349, 302-305. DOI: Greenville, A.C., Wardle, G.M., and Dickman, C.R. 2012. Extreme climatic events drive mammal irruptions: regression analysis of 100 year trends in desert rainfall and temperature. Ecology and evolution 2, 2645-2658. DOI...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (2): 129–133.
Published: 12 September 2014
.... 2012. Extreme climatic events drive mammal irruptions: regression analysis of 100-year trends in desert rainfall and temperature. Ecology and Evolution 2: 2645-2658. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.377 Hobbs, T.J., Morton, S.R., Masters, P., and Jones, K.R. 1994. Influence of pit-trap design...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (2): 231–240.
Published: 11 November 2020
...., and Cowling, A. 2004. The challenge of managing multiple species at multiple scales: reptiles in an Australian grazing landscape. Journal of Applied Ecology 41: 32-44. httpsdoi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2664.2004.00869.x Greenville, A.C., Wardle, G.M., and Dickman, C.R. 2012. Extreme climatic events drive mammal...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 559–567.
Published: 01 December 2018
... such as extreme climatic events and bushfires. They make an important point that, on the basis of their research, it may not be necessary to collect data every year. They then add a personal note, which will resonate with others with 40 years or more of hard-won time series data behind them, that a potential...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 591–609.
Published: 01 December 2018
... targets for management. Under current predictions of climate change in southwestern Australia, the region is likely to have more exceptionally hot years and more extreme temperatures, with an increase in the number and severity of hot days (CSIRO 2007; Hennessy et al. 2008). In the light...