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Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 0001
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1988.009
EISBN: 0959995145
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (2): 214–219.
Published: 11 November 2020
.... That advantage has outweighed occasional cases where a snake is fatally poisoned by consuming a toad. Thus, the overall impact of Cane Toads on Carpet Pythons (and likely, other predator species) is a balance between direct costs and indirect benefits. Negative impacts on individuals may not necessarily...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (3): 457–463.
Published: 01 June 2017
... to safely interact with them. Unfortunately, the relationship between Australians and our wildlife could change significantly. Canine rabies, an infamous, fatal, viral zoonosis, is now less than 300 kilometers from the Australian matiinland. We must face the possibility of a ‘when’, rather than...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (3): 369–376.
Published: 17 March 2014
... Australia. The infectivity of Australian bat Lyssavirus to humans and other mammals is not known, but its close genomic and antigenic relationship to classical rabies virus suggest that it is likely to be capable of causing fatal illness in most mammalian species. Its similarity to classical rabies virus...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 36 (4): 424–428.
Published: 28 January 2014
... the highly toxic Cane Toad metamorphs. Small, late-emerging metamorph frogs are unlikely to encounter metamorph toads small enough to ingest; and hence, are less likely to be fatally poisoned by consuming the toxic invader. Developing in the presence of larval Cane Toads thus increases the native taxon's...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 858–863.
Published: 20 October 2011
...Mike Letnic; Patrick Carmody; John Burke Crocodylus porosus is a species that is potentially dangerous to humans and there are numerous records of fatal attacks by this species on humans. Since the Northern Territory population of C. porosus was declared a protected species in 1971...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 307–314.
Published: 14 October 2011
...Hamish McCallum; Menna Jones As the largest surviving marsupial carnivore, the Tasmanian devil is an iconic species. A disfiguring and invariably fatal facial cancer, first reported in 1996, has now spread across most of the range of the devil, leading to population declines of up to 90...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2008
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2008.018
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-2-9
..., therefore result from young, dispersing animals attempting to cross the highway. Moreover, the locations of fatalities coincide with the intersection of side-tracks and the highway suggesting that some animals are dispersing along the tracks until they meet the highway. Realignment of the highway...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.004
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-3-4
... kangaroo industry stands in sharp contrast to the fatalism of some ecological commentators who can only prescribe mass closure of Australian rural communities and essentially evacuating marginal country. What is needed to achieve these desirable social, economic and conservation goals is a strong marketing...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021)
Published: 02 February 2021
... being attacked by a Florida Keys Giant Centipede Scolopendra alternans. The centipede initially held onto grass stems but was eventually dislodged and dragged about six metres by the toad. The centipede inflicted serious (probably, fatal) injury on the toad but released the amphibian after the centipede...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2019) 40 (1): 118–128.
Published: 01 January 2019
...), jumped from its natural host Sylvilagus brasiliensis, a cottontail rabbit native to the Americas, to the European rabbit, causing severe generalised disease and very high fatality rates in this new host. Decades of research ultimately led to the release of the virus in 1950 at two sites near Lake Urana...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021)
Published: 02 September 2021
... was to examine sightings and databases of sick or injured Road-related mortality koalas and compare these to other areas. While Human-Vehicle related casualties and fatalities Threats to koala survival in Australia have been recorded since the early 1920s (Federal Office of Road Safety 1998); Animal Vehicle Loss...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2012) 35 (4): 1040–1046.
Published: 29 January 2012
..., NSW. Ramp, D. and Ben-Ami, D. 2006. The effect of roadbased fatalities on the viability of a peri-urban swamp wallaby population. Journal of Wildlife Management 70: 1615-1624. The effect of roadbased fatalities on the viability of a peri-urban swamp wallaby population Journal of Wildlife...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 267–274.
Published: 17 March 2014
... just an incident does occur it is more likely to because they have been used in the past if involve serious or fatal injury in the case of better techniques are available. a helicopter. This comparison does not give As mentioned previously, the two different survey techniques necessitate a different...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 251–264.
Published: 14 October 2011
...://www.environment.sa.gov.au/biodiversity/arkoneyre/pdfs/ feral_camels_report.pdf.] Pfeffer, M., Neubauer, H., Wernery, U., Kaaden, O.R. and Meyer, H. 1998. Fatal form of camelpox virus infection. The Veterinary Journal 155: 107-09. Fatal form of camelpox virus infection The Veterinary Journal 155 107 09...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (4): 446–457.
Published: 17 March 2014
... have some very obvious differences. Perhaps most notably, two human fatalities are recorded from dingo attacks since Europeans have been on the Australian continent.2 Increased attention has been paid to the management of both species and their interactions with people in recent years. Problems...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 25 (3): 65–67.
Published: 17 March 2014
... fatalities are unlikely. Nonethe- less, at least two serious bites (one of them fatal) have been suffered by people who mistook adult Broad- headed Snakes for juveniles of the harmless Diamond Python (Morelia spilota), which has a similar colour pattern and occurs in the same areas. Broad-headed Snakes...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (3): 417–420.
Published: 17 March 2014
... in the bibliography, the draft plan canvasses various ways the slump [in shark numbers] can be countered". Presumably Greg Norman eamed the label of "white shark'' because it was fatal to tangle with him, or because he was ferocious in attack and to be greatly feared, and not because he was an endangered species...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (1): 9–17.
Published: 04 October 2011
... danger went off most people stayed in the water: It s because we think, or used to think, we had some God-given right to this piece of water. Fatal shark attacks happen off the south coast. They don t happen in a metre of water just a few metres from our beach (The Weekend Australian Magazine 06-07. 01...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2016) 38 (2): 212–213.
Published: 01 January 2016
... several other published Lampropholis delicata in its jaws (Fig. 2). or anecdotal accounts of this phenomenon. In other Discussion Both cases were in residential areas, involved adult L. delicata, and apparently were fatal for the skink involved (based on a lack of struggling). Garden skinks are active...