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Journal Articles
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
10.7882/FS.2011.039
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... Orchardists have used electrified grids, which kill or injure flying-foxes, to “protect” fruit crops. In recent years legal challenges to this practice have been mounted on conservation and animal cruelty grounds. A 2001 Federal Court judgement prohibited use of one 6.4km grid because...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
10.7882/FS.2004.041
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... Fruit-eating birds disperse many rainforest seeds, thereby influencing rainforest regeneration. The abundance of these birds may change following forest clearing, causing differences in seed dispersal between extensively-forested and fragmented areas. We assessed the responses of 26 frugivorous...
Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
10.7882/FS.2002.035
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... eligibility for the loans are too limiting and should be altered. In addition, fruit growers find it difficult to get accurate, up to date information on netting. A netting hotline should be established to provide growers with information on net design, how to reduce the cost of netting their crops...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
10.7882/FS.2002.044
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
10.7882/FS.2011.040
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... species is unique in that it is also recognised as a horticultural pest, predominantly in coastal orchards of south-eastern Australia. In times of native resource (pollen, nectar and rainforest fruits) shortage, flying-foxes are known to utilise commercial fruit crops. As such, the species is affected...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
10.7882/FS.2002.038
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... Flying-foxes are considered by the fruit industry to be the main vertebrate pest in coastal areas of New South Wales and South East Queensland. From 1995 to 2000, the annual average gross market losses to the market value of fruit due to flying-foxes, in New South Wales, was estimated at $10.4...
Journal Articles
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
10.7882/FS.2002.033
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... The NSW government has seen fit to list the Grey Headed Flying-fox (GHFF) as Vulnerable. The listing will limit the ability of fruit growers to protect their crops from damage by this species. The GHFF has been protected by government on behalf of the community. In my submission...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
10.7882/FS.2002.047
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... infections are transmitted directly to humans, direct contact with an ABL-infected flying-foxes presents a serious human health risk from a saliva-contaminated bite, scratch or mucous membrane. Fruit is not regarded as a mode of transmission, but for aesthetic and general hygiene reasons, eating fruit...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
10.7882/FS.2002.036
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... Flying-fox predation has been a problem to horticulturists on the North Coast of New South Wales since the industry was established. Predation is especially severe in spring/early summer when most fruit crops are ripening. Flying-fox predation has inflicted considerable losses on fruit...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
10.7882/FS.2002.050
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... orchardists surveyed recorded a problem. Flying-foxes eating fruit was a common problem identified by respondents from all areas, but aspects of their presence (such as noise and mess) was a greater problem for respondents in the urban Sydney Metropolitan area. Country NSW respondents more commonly observed...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
10.7882/FS.2002.032
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... Flying-foxes come into conflict with fruit growers when they raid fruit crops in response to limited native food resources. A standard technique used by fruit growers to deter flying-foxes has been to shoot the animals as they enter the orchard. This activity has been regulated by National Parks...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
10.7882/FS.2002.040
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... The National Parks & Wildlife Service (NPWS) on the far north coast of NSW has been involved with issues of flying-fox damage to fruit crops since the early 1980s. Although shooting is an ineffective method of crop protection and is not the one preferred by the majority of fruit growers...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 698–710.
Published: 20 October 2011
...Anja Divljan; Kerryn Parry-Jones; Peggy Eby For several years, animal welfare concerns have been raised over the practice of shooting Grey-headed Flying-foxes (GHFF) in commercial fruit orchards in Australia, and the role of government agencies in licensing the kill. In NSW the practice is poorly...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
10.7882/FS.2002.041
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... This paper outlines a tree-planting scheme with the dual aim of conserving Grey-headed Flying-foxes Pteropus poliocephalus and reducing damage to fruit crops. Grey-headed Flying-foxes experience resource bottlenecks during winter and spring because of past habitat clearing and the erratic...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (4): 972–984.
Published: 28 October 2022
... eutherians) and a large flightless bird (the southern cassowary, Casuarius casuarius ) were collected and processed in 84 moist chamber cultures. Fifty-two percent of these cultures yielded evidence (fruiting bodies and/or plasmodia) of myxomycetes. Eleven species belonging to seven genera were recorded...
Journal Articles