1-20 of 63 Search Results for

fruit crop protection

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.040
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... The National Parks & Wildlife Service (NPWS) on the far north coast of NSW has been involved with issues of flying-fox damage to fruit crops since the early 1980s. Although shooting is an ineffective method of crop protection and is not the one preferred by the majority of fruit growers...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.033
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... The NSW government has seen fit to list the Grey Headed Flying-fox (GHFF) as Vulnerable. The listing will limit the ability of fruit growers to protect their crops from damage by this species. The GHFF has been protected by government on behalf of the community. In my submission...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.038
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... million per year. Exclusion netting has proven to be the most effective method of protecting fruit crops from flying-foxes. However, concerns regarding the economic viability of netting have prevented its use in areas where market returns are relatively low, such as the Camden district of NSW. To test...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.032
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... Flying-foxes come into conflict with fruit growers when they raid fruit crops in response to limited native food resources. A standard technique used by fruit growers to deter flying-foxes has been to shoot the animals as they enter the orchard. This activity has been regulated by National Parks...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.039
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... Orchardists have used electrified grids, which kill or injure flying-foxes, to “protectfruit crops. In recent years legal challenges to this practice have been mounted on conservation and animal cruelty grounds. A 2001 Federal Court judgement prohibited use of one 6.4km grid because...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.028
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... to be primary management tools despite their failure either to provide consistent protection to the commercial fruit industry or to resolve conflict at controversial camps. There is an urgent need to develop new approaches to flying-fox management. It is our view that effective methods of on-crop control...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.046
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
...”; there is a need to both protect flying-fox populations and the crops of fruit growers; and the emergence of Australian Bat Lyssavirus and other viruses has made handling bats a risk. The conservation status of the Grey-headed Flying-fox and the Spectacled Flying-fox is currently being reviewed by the Scientific...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.042
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... flying-foxes, then it must recognise the genuine concerns of growers for their livelihoods, subsidise non-lethal modes of protecting crops, and provide support for research into cheaper and more effective means of protection. ...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 698–710.
Published: 20 October 2011
... this, a total of 164 dead or injured flying-foxes were collected ( n = 146) or observed ( n = 18) from an orchard in western Sydney over two weeks in spring 2007, after shooting had occurred at the orchard to protect fruit crops. Detailed information, including sex, reproductive state, age and description...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.052
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... methods of deterrence was the presence of non-flying young during summer. Three methods were trialled, including sonic deterrence with a Phoenix Wailer (a crop protection system), olfactory deterrence with python excrement, and taste aversion with prawn paste. Trials with the Phoenix Bat Wailer...
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/9780958608541
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 38–54.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... comm.) who feared a change in status, especially at the State level where conservation status has legal implications under the Nature Conservation Act 1992 and Regulations 1994, would severely restrict their abilities to protect fruit crops with current technology. As a result of their representations...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 39 (1): 127–145.
Published: 01 December 2017
... and reduced longevity so much so that the World Health Organization has labelled meat a carcinogen. Modern meat production depends on intensive animal production and the feeding of crops to animals, commonly known as “factory farming” or, more formally, “Industrial Farm Animal Production” (IFAP...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (3): 310–315.
Published: 17 March 2014
..., Distribution and Taxonomy of Australia Flying-foxes (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae). Aust. Mammal. 10: 75-81. Identification, Distribution and Taxonomy of Australia Flying-foxes (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae) Aust. Mammal. 10 75 81 Hall, L. S., and Richards, C. C., 1987. Crop protection and management...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2015) 37 (4): 461–471.
Published: 01 September 2015
... in South Australia and Western Australia have exterminated reported individuals, effectively preventing any population establishment, solely for the protection of fruit crops (Barrington 1985; Paton 1985; Higgins et al. 2006). To justify the investment of an eradication program, it would be appropriate...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (2): 403–409.
Published: 17 March 2014
... of the globe (Borror et al. 1992). It is a cosmopolitan, polyphagous pest and can cause severe damage to both agricultural and greenhouse crops (Beattie and Jiang 1990; Hill 1997; Lewis 1973) feeding on young and mature leaves and fruits (Mound and Teulon 1995). Greenhouse thrips cause damage to their host...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (3): 379–389.
Published: 01 June 2017
... you could do.” He claims that if we stop eating grazing animals and turn to a vegetarian diet then we will need to farm an additional area the size of Victoria plus Tasmania to meet our nutritional needs. Compared to rangeland grazing, clearing such large areas for crops means a loss of the vegetation...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (1): 76–100.
Published: 17 March 2014
... of the Grey-headed Flying Fox in NSW p51-55. Hall, L.S. and Richards, G.C., 1987. Crop protection and management of flying foxes (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae). Australian Mammalogy 10: 137-39. Crop protection and management of flying foxes (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae) Australian Mammalogy 10 137 39...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 29 (3-4): 239–244.
Published: 17 March 2014
... and at times children with "shang-hais" and pea rifles would also shoot them, but no decline in numbers was noticed. From what I have been told they were n o t a crop pest locally but individual fruit trees were raided. The shoot- ing was mostly f o r sport, o r a days outing and only happened every once...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (1990) 26 (2): 101–107.
Published: 01 June 1990
... are that protection of the fruit is a promising line for research and development and ought to be pursued. Commercial groups, such as the Banana Growers' Federation, working against flying fox protection polarize the issue in the community but fail to stimulate the research needed to conserve their bananas. Mass...