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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2023) 43 (2): 339–367.
Published: 03 November 2023
... with communities to manage flying-fox camps. To facilitate this, the NSW Government delivered the Flying-fox Grants Program, which provided funds for land managers to prepare and implement flying-fox management plans and undertake community engagement. There were three funding rounds, the first spanning 2016-18...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
10.7882/FS.2012.031
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-8-1
... constitute the majority of the fauna, are neglected. In part this is because the invertebrate fauna is largely undescribed. Funds for correcting this anamoly are declining, with fewer taxonomists available to do the work. While in principle governments support the need to document and manage Australia's...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
10.7882/FS.2002.037
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... No research funds have been made available to produce aversion agents and/or tactics to reduce the need for orchardists to cull flying-foxes to protect their crops. This has occurred despite many years of effort by growers to attract research funds from government and industry groups. It appears...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (2): 534–560.
Published: 24 June 2022
..., ACT, Australia, 2601 3World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), Level 3, 60 Leicester Street, Carlton, VIC, Australia. *Corresponding author, email: kara.youngentob.anu.edu.au Co-last authors Nest boxes are often deployed in an attempt to offset the loss of natural tree hollows following landscape...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (2): 186–193.
Published: 30 September 2020
.... Corporations donated produce to feed flying-foxes in care and provide supplementary feeding for wild populations of rock-wallabies and pygmy-possums. Local businesses and organisations also supplied resources, funding and food storage capacity to support these conservation actions. The contributions from...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
10.7882/FS.2002.021
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-5-8
... World Wide Fund for Nature asks the question, “Is science demonstrating leadership for conservation?” It is our view that science is not, and that is unfortunate since scientists, especially naturalists, were vital to the development of the very concept of conservation. We are concerned...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 755–768.
Published: 01 December 2018
...-term monitoring programs, and subsequently formed the Long Term Ecological Research Network in Australia in 2011 through Commonwealth funding, only to see it de-funded in 2017. We synthesise these learnings to identify four key characteristics of any successful ecological monitoring program, and eight...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (4): 919–936.
Published: 20 May 2022
... to subsidise fruit growers’ costs of installing exclusion netting on orchards, accompanied by the gradual phase out of legal shooting of flying-foxes in NSW. The AUD$7.1 million scheme was designed to fund up to 50 percent of the cost of purchasing and installing exclusion netting, capped at AUD$20,000 per...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 576–580.
Published: 01 December 2018
... to establish (and then even harder to maintain) long-term ecological research and monitoring. These factors include: (1) a focus on novelty in science publication and awarding of grants that disadvantages long-term studies, (2) a paucity of long-term funding, (3) a bias against the publication of place-based...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (3): 422–429.
Published: 01 June 2017
...Pauline M Ross; Philip Poronnik ABSTRACT Danger exists in using deficit and decline narratives that unsurprisingly have paralleled evidenced declines in research funding for Australian science. While surveys suggest a public lack of understanding of science which is all too often diagnosed...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
10.7882/FS.2012.030
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-8-1
... for biodiversity and for Australia's iconic fauna, higher levels within CSIRO and both federal and many state governments have failed to provide adequate funding. I explore here some possible explanations based on my personal observations. The underlying causes are not confined to Australia, and lie deep...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2023)
Published: 17 November 2023
... free-range systems. Papua New Guinea’s human health system and the animal health field and laboratory services are resource-limited and are facing many human and animal disease challenges. The Fleming Fund Country Grant, implemented by the Burnet Institute Australia, is working with Papua New Guinea...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
10.7882/FS.2002.018
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-5-8
.... Thus, a major aspiration of involving the community in biodiversity conservation will not be fulfilled. By the same token, some communities are rejecting the inclusion of scientific research when dealing with conservation problems. The Natural Heritage Trust (NHT), for example, receives massive funding...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
10.7882/FS.2012.032
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-8-1
... As with many public debates, the debate on climate change has a number of participants whose activities are influential, secretive and unethical. In the climate change debate, some fossil fuel corporations have funded apparently unrelated bodies which claim to have some scientific expertise...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
10.7882/FS.2007.008
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-1-2
... Solenopsis invita Buren (the red imported fire ant) was officially identified in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia in early 2001 and soon after a national fire ant eradication program (funded by the Australian, State and Territory governments) to remove fire ants from Australia was approved...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
10.7882/FS.2011.040
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... the levels of flying-fox damage (temporally and spatially), determine the factors contributing to trends in crop damage, and assess the effectiveness of mitigative measures employed by horticulturists to reduce flying-fox damage. The project is funded for two financial years through the Australian...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (4): 897–918.
Published: 24 May 2022
... and conservation issues, such as habitat destruction and food shortages, anthropogenic injuries and extreme heat events. While there have been several independent efforts to conserve flying-fox habitat leading up to the recent commencement of a state-wide funding program for flying-fox habitat restoration...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1999
10.7882/RZSNSW.1999.026
EISBN: 0-9586085-1-2
... allocation of funds and expertise. Current taxonomic expertise is limited, and could be focused for greater collective effect in conservation activities, particularly by emphasizing higher groups established as having priority value in ecological interpretation, and capitalizing on knowledge already...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (3): 702–718.
Published: 24 January 2022
... rescue services, such as how much government support occurs and whether wildlife carers are volunteers or employed. Wildlife rescue services are highly valued by the people that use them. Perhaps paradoxically these users have low awareness of how these services are organised or funded. The findings...