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Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.033
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... The NSW government has seen fit to list the Grey Headed Flying-fox (GHFF) as Vulnerable. The listing will limit the ability of fruit growers to protect their crops from damage by this species. The GHFF has been protected by government on behalf of the community. In my submission...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.035
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... for netting becomes more acute. However, poor returns make it hard for the grower, especially the small-scale grower, to meet the cost of exclusion netting. Low interest loans that cover the cost of netting are available through the NSW government's Rural Assistance Scheme. However, the criteria for assessing...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.034
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022)
Published: 20 May 2022
... to subsidise fruit growers’ costs of installing exclusion netting on orchards, accompanied by the gradual phase out of legal shooting of flying-foxes in NSW. The AUD$7.1 million scheme was designed to fund up to 50 percent of the cost of purchasing and installing exclusion netting, capped at AUD$20,000 per...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.042
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... Many fruit growers see flying-foxes such as the Grey-headed Flying-fox as a threat to their livelihood. Understandably, when large numbers of the animals suddenly enter orchards and cause significant damage, growers start to talk of “population explosions” of the animals. In this paper we...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.039
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... 1995 (TSC Act). The procedures can be complex and costly, and it is unlikely that many growers could afford to comply with the requirements of the Act. In addition, the processes required under the TSC Act are relatively slow and unsuited to the rapid response needed when sudden large influxes...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.032
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... Flying-foxes come into conflict with fruit growers when they raid fruit crops in response to limited native food resources. A standard technique used by fruit growers to deter flying-foxes has been to shoot the animals as they enter the orchard. This activity has been regulated by National Parks...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.040
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... The National Parks & Wildlife Service (NPWS) on the far north coast of NSW has been involved with issues of flying-fox damage to fruit crops since the early 1980s. Although shooting is an ineffective method of crop protection and is not the one preferred by the majority of fruit growers...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 39 (1): 146–153.
Published: 01 December 2017
... ‘sheep rangelands’ into desert. Seeking an economically productive alternative, I imagined a scenario in which the value of kangaroo meat could be increased enough, by effective marketing, to encourage wool growers to see kangaroos as a resource rather than a pest, and to reduce sheep numbers and, thus...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 38–54.
Published: 17 March 2014
... to Spectacled Flying Fox management by fruit growers, researchers, conservation groups and the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service. Spectacled Flying Fox Pteropus conspicillatus Census Conservation assessment Rainforest The conservation status of the Spectacled Flying Fox Pteropus...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 463–533.
Published: 20 October 2011
..., presumably favoured the survival and spread of foxes. Foxes were also translocated by some crop growers in an effort to combat rabbits and hares, though this is poorly documented. The dense forests of Gippsland impeded colonisation, so that Victoria was probably not entirely colonised until about 1900. Foxes...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022)
Published: 10 May 2022
... for commercial fruit growers anxious about the implications on lethal methods used to address flying-foxes visiting orchards (Biel 2002; Comensoli 2002), particularly with proposals to phase out licences for shooting flying-foxes (Waples 2002). Such concerns were reflected in the NSW Government-sponsored forum...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.036
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... committee to address management problems; 2) incentives are required to encourage/assist growers to net their orchards; 3) governments must make a serious commitment to an integrated and properly-funded research effort; 4) shooting under licence should continue until effective non-lethal alternatives...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.037
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... No research funds have been made available to produce aversion agents and/or tactics to reduce the need for orchardists to cull flying-foxes to protect their crops. This has occurred despite many years of effort by growers to attract research funds from government and industry groups. It appears...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.046
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
...”; there is a need to both protect flying-fox populations and the crops of fruit growers; and the emergence of Australian Bat Lyssavirus and other viruses has made handling bats a risk. The conservation status of the Grey-headed Flying-fox and the Spectacled Flying-fox is currently being reviewed by the Scientific...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.050
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... flying-foxes on domestic fruit trees than on either native or orchard trees. Even though it was well known that orchardists had a problem with flying-foxes, it was not anticipated that domestic growers had a problem as well. Thus management of flying-foxes must consider their impact on domestically grown...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 39 (1): 39–42.
Published: 01 December 2017
... of protection is also mobilised. acceptable norms in the industry. She argues that these conditions are not so much the fault of every individual Because of this logic of protection, because of sheep wool grower as much as lack of economic viability on country , the lives of sheep and dingoes are mixed up...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (1990) 26 (2): 54–58.
Published: 01 June 1990
... naive conseIVationists: money. As most of the semi-arid zone is used for grazing, the financial well-being of the pastoralists is an essential prerequisite for off-reseIVe conseIVation. However, economic conditions are not rosy for wool growers. As I write this essay (May 1990), the Australian wool...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (1990) 26 (2): 101–107.
Published: 01 June 1990
... officer with NPWS) has found that the bats in the Gordon colony are part of a continuously mobile population throughout eastern New South Wales. Flying foxes are indeed Tim Moore's constituents (his term). Let's not forget the plight of the banana growers. When the native trees have less fruit and flowers...
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/9780958608541
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1