1-20 of 148 Search Results for

hollow-using fauna

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (2): 134–138.
Published: 30 September 2014
... of feathertail gliders (Acrobates pygmaeus) in Victoria. Pp. 403-408 in Possums and Gliders, edited by A.P. Smith and I.D. Hume Australian Mammal Society, Sydney. Possums and Gliders 403 408 Gibbons, P. and Lindenmayer, D.B. 2002. The hollow-using fauna of Australia. Pp. 4-19 in Tree Hollows...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.004
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... Forest wildlife management in Australian eucalypt forests emphasizes the retention of tree hollows for fauna requiring hollows for nesting or denning. This overlooks the requirements of birds in eucalypt forests for a variety of resources for nesting and foraging other than tree hollows. Some...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (3): 462–476.
Published: 17 March 2014
...Robert Taylor; John Woinarski; Ray Chatto Information on forest use and dependence on tree hollows was collated for vertebrates in the Top End of the Northern Territory. The proportion of the total fauna that used hollows was 40% for mammals, 18% for birds, 20% for reptiles and 13% for frogs...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.043
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... Nest boxes are used world-wide to provide substitute nest sites for a range of hollow-dependent fauna. Most nest box studies are carried out in forested environments to determine whether nest boxes might be a substitute for the loss of hollows. Although nest boxes are popular in urban backyards...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.015
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... is permitted will bear the brunt of this logging with likely short and long-term consequences for habitat quality, especially for hollow-dependent fauna. Native forest habitats on freehold land, where environmental controls on harvesting are less rigorous, are also likely to suffer from increased pressure...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.988
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
..., which takes the older trees and shifts the age-class distribution to younger trees with fewer hollows. A looming threat is climate change. We need an expanded vision that looks beyond the paradigm of conserving special species ( e.g. threatened species) and selected spaces ( e.g . national parks...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 54–57.
Published: 01 October 2020
... floor of a hollow used for nesting by Carnaby s Cockatoo need as conservation dependent fauna under Western was on 11th November 2019. The hollow had a vertical Australian state legislation because of a major decline aspect, was 1350 mm deep, had a floor diameter of 340 mm, in the wheatbelt...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (4): 426–436.
Published: 17 March 2014
... diameter. Categorising tree hollows by size can allow for an assessment of what tree dimensions are needed before hollows of a certain size are formed. 4. Fauna (a) Pitfall Trapping - Nine trap lines were used in this survey. Each trapline consisted of five pits (PVC tube, 15 cm diameter, 30 cm deep...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (1): 22–36.
Published: 04 October 2011
... Tasmania, Hobart. Green, R.H. 1993. The fauna of Tasmania: mammals. Potoroo Publishing, Launceston, Tasmania. The fauna of Tasmania: mammals Haseler, M. and Taylor, R. 1993. Use of tree hollows by birds in sclerophyll forest in north-eastern Tasmania. Tasforests 5: 51-56. Use of tree...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020)
Published: 28 December 2020
... or in their canopy. During the clearing activities, a total of 19 individual Chelosania were located and translocated. Interestingly, three of the individuals found were observed coming out of tree hollows once the tree had been knocked over. Although the abundance of Chelosania at this site was only recorded as 0.1...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (3): 480–481.
Published: 17 March 2014
... australis in a tree-hollow in northern New South Wales. This species is more commonly associated with cave roosting and breeding (Churchill 1998). This suggests that though some bat species have a strong affiliation to a roost type, flexible roosting strategies may be used. Selective pressures such as roost...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (4): 449–466.
Published: 17 March 2014
... Glider Petaurus norfoicensis , was tapped during supplementary searches. Elevation (climate) and best type were the major factors accounting for the distribution of this fauna. Minor environmental gradients included geology, the density of hollow-bearing trees, topography, logging intensity and fire...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (2): 359–370.
Published: 01 January 2018
..., but they are not reviewed in this paper. These include the retention of hollow trees, recruits and other specialised resources such as sap and flower feed trees within the net harvesting area (referred to as wildlife prescriptions) which provide a scattering of hollow and feed resources across the landscape (Meek 2004...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (2): 220–230.
Published: 11 November 2020
... hollow-bearing trees need to be protected by buffers of unlogged forest within wood production forests to promote their standing life and better conserve cavity-dependent fauna such as the Critically Endangered Leadbeater’s Possum ( Gymnobelideus leadbeateri ) and other declining taxa like the Greater...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (1): 23–28.
Published: 20 March 2014
.../10.7882/AZ.2013.008 Andrew et al. Australian Zoologist volume 37 (1)24 2014 hollow-dwelling fauna. Most of the tree canopy in the blackbutt tall open forests had been removed by the fire and so food resources for the folivorous greater glider (Fleay 1947; Henry 1995) would have been severely limited...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (2): 180–187.
Published: 17 March 2014
... trees had numerous hollow branches. The presence of stumps indicated selective logging had occurred in the past. The methods used to detect Yellow-bellied Gliders concentrated on the location of critical habitat components that the gliders require, that is sap feed trees (see Henry and Craig 1984...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 36 (4): 461–469.
Published: 28 January 2014
... hollows in complementary studies (Ellis and Taylor 2013; Rayner et al. in press). An Anabat detector (Titley Electronics, Ballina, Australia) mounted slightly above horizontal, 2.5 m above ground level on the trunk of a River Red Gum tree clear of any foliage was used at each site (Fig. 2). Detectors were...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 283–290.
Published: 14 October 2011
.... Bioscience 50: 653-666. The global decline of reptiles, déjà vu amphibians Bioscience 50 653 666 Gibbons, P. and Lindenmayer, D.B. 1997. Conserving Hollow-dependent Fauna in Timber-production Forests. Environmental Heritage Monograph Series No. 3. NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service, Sydney...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2015) 37 (4): 517–528.
Published: 01 September 2015
... Northern Plains Region: Narrabri, NSW. Parnaby, H., Lunney, D. and Fleming, M. 2011. Four issues influencing the management of hollow-using bats of the Pilliga forests of inland New South Wales. Pp. 399-420 in The Biology and Conservation of Australasian Bats, edited by B. Law, P. Eby, D. Lunney and L...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 25 (1): 1–6.
Published: 17 March 2014
... of the redgum forest. It was the only dasyurid species found active during daylight - regularly from June to September. This species may use the same shelter for extended periods as two large hollows near the base of two bluebushes were daily used by two individuals. Faecal droppings of trapped individuals con...