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human attitudes

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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (4): 575–584.
Published: 01 June 2020
... this study can be harnessed to inform future policy and management decisions, design interventions to change conservation behaviours, and provides a foundation for further enquiry into the ‘human dimensions of wildlife’. There remains a wildlife conservation ‘attitude-intention-action gap’, where we...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2008
10.7882/FS.2008.004
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-2-9
... Attacks by Australian Magpies Gymnorhina tibicen on humans are among the most common forms of human-wildlife conflict in Australia, especially in suburban environments. Despite the familiarity of these interactions, remarkably little is known about the phenomenon, significantly undermining...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2008
10.7882/FS.2008.032
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-2-9
..., and that of his colleagues, of the divergent attitudes towards koalas. Among the many benefits provided to humans by the wildlife resource, we have tackled just one value in this book - recreational. Wildlife can also cause problems for people. Among the negative values of wildlife, we selected but one topic...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (3): 457–463.
Published: 01 June 2017
... have found that Australians enjoy living with wildlife and value it highly (Miller 2003; FitzGibbon and Jones 2006; Russell et al. 2011; Wilks et al. 2013). However, these biophilic attitudes (Wilson 1984) do not necessarily extend to pest species, i.e. those which have a negative impact on humans...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2016) 38 (1): 17–25.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Jill Bough Our complex and contradictory relationships with animals is demonstrated in our relationships with donkeys Equus asinus . The Australian context exemplifies these conflicting attitudes: once exploited as a beast of burden in the Outback in colonial times, the donkey has since been...
Journal Articles
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
10.7882/FS.2007.053
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-0-5
... of ecological processes — and evaluate how attitudes and policies in Australia are addressing the problem here. Although animals in arid Australia show many similar adaptations to those of ecologically equivalent animals elsewhere, the taxonomic composition of Australia's desert fauna is unique. Some species...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (4): 585–604.
Published: 01 June 2020
... that are experiencing high levels of pressure from human development and are therefore of substantial conservation significance (Chapman 2009). Preferences for conserving wildlife species, however, are dependent on underlying human values and attitudes, that differ between individuals and organisations (Redford et al...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (3): 550–567.
Published: 27 October 2020
... so remains challenging given the complexities of human-wildlife conflict, including the diversity of contexts and species, and people s attitudes toward wildlife, perceptions of risk, personal experience, and social factors, such as religious affiliation, ethnicity, and culture (Dickman 2010; van...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (3): 369–378.
Published: 17 March 2014
... and the public debate that they engender, because I believe they are laden with symbolic meanings. Most anthropologists would agree that human attitudes to animals are projections of our attitudes to others and ourselves. As I will demonstrate, public attitudes to the bilby and the rabbit reveal that ideas...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (3): 770–810.
Published: 16 March 2022
... a trajectory of change. Culturally, these changes include a shift in attitudes to the species from agricultural pest and popular native bird to a vilified, “overabundant” native species and nemesis of small woodland birds. Ecologically, changes have included an expansion in distribution and abundance of Noisy...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (3): 702–718.
Published: 24 January 2022
... interviews for the second part of the study. Demographics were not collected and participation was voluntary and anonymous for both the survey and the interviews. Ethics approval for the survey and interviews was provided by the University of Otago Human Ethics Committee. Online survey: public attitudes...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 534–543.
Published: 20 October 2011
.... The Motivational Bases of Attitudes towards Animals Society and Animals 2 1 11 HSA - Humane Society Australia. 2009. Grey Nurse Shark - Fact Sheet. Retrieved January 23, 2009 from http://www.hsi.org.au/?catID=115 Hunter, V. 2002. (Jan. 2) Live and Let Swim. The Courier Mail, p. 15. Ingold, T...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2024)
Published: 24 January 2024
...Matthew Mo; Libby A. Timmiss; Tim Pearson; Maree Treadwell Kerr; Sera Steves; Justin A. Welbergen ABSTRACT Negative public attitudes toward particular species can have significant impact on their conservation. Traditional approaches to improving public perceptions of flying-foxes include defending...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2023)
Published: 08 December 2023
... have a peculiar attitude towards sharks. It s pathological and it runs deep. Other cultures have their wolves and bears, their lions and tigers the carnivorous demon lurking in the shadows. Here there is no growling menace out there in the dark. Our demon is silent and it swims. This being so...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (3): 1–847.
Published: 22 November 2022
... and participation was voluntary and anonymous for both the survey and the interviews. Ethics approval for the survey and interviews was provided by the University of Otago Human Ethics Committee. Online survey: public attitudes to wildlife rescue An online survey link was sent by text message to 9,600 mobile phone...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2008
10.7882/FS.2008.007
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-2-9
... The brushtail possum is common in Sydney's bushland suburbs, where it is often valued and made welcome. However, some suburban residents do not either value or welcome brushtail possums on their properties. This study probed the attitudes of both groups of people towards the animals...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (3): 388–397.
Published: 17 March 2014
... donkeys and humans during the second part of the twentieth century that resulted in the latter eventually being classed as vermin. The issue of feral donkeys will be addressed, as will the attitudes in contemporary society that have caused and compounded the feral problem. Compton (2003:44) has observed...