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hypogeous fungi

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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (2): 203–208.
Published: 10 October 2011
... ecotone in northeastern Australia and analysed them for the presence of fungal spores. Of the 20 samples collected, 12 contained spores of several types of hypogeous fungi, with the number of spore types per sample ranging from 1-7, with a mean of 5. Twenty fungal spore types were recognised in total...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.936
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... of fire on the wide range of hypogeous fungi eaten by mammals. Evidence of a ‘co-evolutionary relationship’, as some authors have implied, is also ambiguous. We are concerned that some land management agencies, which use prescribed fire for hazard reduction or silvicultural purposes, selectively use...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 681–684.
Published: 20 October 2011
... 656 Malajczuk, N., Trappe, J.M. and Molina, R. 1987. Interrelationships among some ectomycorrhizal trees, hypogeous fungi and small mammals: Western Australian and northwestern American parallels. Australian Journal of Ecology 12: 53-55. Interrelationships among some ectomycorrhizal trees...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 36 (4): 494–506.
Published: 28 January 2014
.... http://dx.doi.org/10.1071%2FZO9940701 Claridge, A.W., Tanton, M.T. and Cunningham, R.B. 1993. Hypogeal fungi in the diet of the Long-nosed Potoroo (Potorous tridactylus) in mixed-species and regrowth eucalypt forest stands in south-eastern Australia. Wildlife Research 20: 321-7. http://dx.doi.org...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021)
Published: 04 August 2021
... settlement (N. Graham, pers. comm This could have resulted in a reduction in the production of hypogeous fungi, some species of which are stimulated by fire (Vernes et al. 2001) and form an important component of the diet of Long-nosed Potoroo (Claridge et al. 1993; Vernes and Jarman 2014). Mason (1997) also...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (3): 414–423.
Published: 01 September 2018
... mammals are considered to be one of the groups most detrimentally affected by urbanisation (Garden et al. 2006). The Long-nosed Potoroo is highly mycophagous, a specialised consumer of the fruiting bodies of underground or hypogeal fungi that are colloquially known as truffles (Guiler 1971; Bennett...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (3): 343–349.
Published: 14 November 2014
...., and Claridge, A. 2005. Hypogeous fungi: Evoloution of reproductive and dispersal strategies through interactions with animals and mycorrhizal plants. Pp. 599-611 in The Fungal Community (3rd edition), edited by J. Dighton, J. White and P. Oudemans. Taylor & Francis, London. http://dx.doi.org/10.1201...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (1): 90–95.
Published: 04 October 2011
... opportunistically while digging. We noted very few fungal fruiting bodies at Scotia, perhaps owing to the dry conditions that prevailed throughout the study period. The fruiting bodies of hypogeous fungi are important components of the diet of a number of medium-sized marsupials (Claridge and May 1994; Claridge et...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (1): 15–22.
Published: 02 June 2014
... 2008). As well as serving a social function (Ebensperger and Hayes 2008) these high-density autumn sites may be providing an important foraging resource, hypogeal fungi, a food source which this species relies upon in the cooler months (Jefferys and Fox 2001; Tokushima and Jarman 2010) and which may...
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/9780958608589
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1991
DOI: 10.7882/CAFF.1991
EISBN: 0-9599951-5-3