1-20 of 229 Search Results for

kind

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2008
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2008.002
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-2-9
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 550–554.
Published: 20 October 2011
...Alistair Melzer; William Ellis; Greg Gordon; Gail Tucker; Robyn Kindness; Frank Carrick Tooth wear patterns among P. cinereus on St Bees Island in the humid Central Queensland Coast bio geographic region differ significantly from those observed in the sub-humid Brigalow Belt bio geographic region...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (2): 220–230.
Published: 11 November 2020
..., particularly post-fire salvage logging that occurred in some areas following the 2009 wildfires. Beyond interactions between fire and post-fire (salvage) logging and their effects on forest biota, we have uncovered evidence of other kinds of interactions in Mountain Ash forests. These include interactions...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (2): 186–193.
Published: 30 September 2020
... the unprecedented bushfire season in Australia in the 2019–20 summer, corporations, businesses and organisations contributed significant financial and in-kind support for the Saving our Species Program’s threatened species recovery efforts. On the eastern coast, a combination of food shortages and heat stress...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.049
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-8-1
... are particularly concerned that this single metric results in systematic suppression of research vital for conservation biology in Australia. We outline the ways by which Journal Impact Factors impact negatively on the kinds of research which underpin the conservation of Australia's biodiversity. We argue...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2016) 38 (1): 130–146.
Published: 01 January 2016
... and may exclude other birds from the habitats they occupy thereby affecting the composition of avian communities and the distribution of species on a landscape scale. Such behaviour has cascading effects on ecosystems, changing the abundances and kinds of plant-eating arthropods. A comprehensive knowledge...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2013
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2013.017
EISBN: 978-0-9874309-1-5
... In using the term ‘dark age’ to reflect on the kind of cultural world we find ourselves in at this time, I am invoking analogies with various times and places when old certainties are moving into a state of collapse, but a new culture has not yet emerged to offer moral and social cohesion. Our...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.050
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-8-1
... will survive the new conditions, nor will those kinds of research and researchers that do not meet the preferences of the surviving journals. This is an example of politically driven change with far-reaching environmental consequences - what Recher and Ehrlich (2005) called ‘the Arbustocene’. In particular...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (3): 387–392.
Published: 14 October 2011
..., New South Wales. The aims of these surveys were to gain an understanding of how widespread bell frogs were through the residential area and to identify how to involve the local community in some kind of monitoring of this endangered frog. There were 65 responses to the first questionnaire; 53...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (3): 453–458.
Published: 14 October 2011
... for breeding, though there are other kinds of water bodies that may also be used for breeding. The seasonal flooding regime for the rice mirrors the breeding requirements for this frog species. However, through reduction in flooding of natural habitat areas, diversion of water to rice and other irrigation...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.040
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... Government's Natural Heritage Trust Strategic Reserve funding and State Government contributions (cash and in-kind), and addresses several recovery actions of the draft National Recovery Plan for the Grey-headed Flying-fox. The project proposal was also strongly supported by the NSW Flying-fox Consultative...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.029
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... observations of a sufficiently broad and relevant nature and over a sufficient time frame are of an anecdotal kind and few in number. There is a large number of fauna species involved, many of them rare and about which relatively little is known or it is difficult to obtain information concerning them...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.076
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
... roads and in parks and gardens with indigenous species and the creation of complex foliage structures. This is necessary to foster an abundant arthropod fauna for insectivores to feed upon and to provide the kinds of habitats such birds require. Whether such changes are essential or even desirable...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 0001
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1998.024
EISBN: 9780958608503
... to preserve the Earth’s biodiversity. The biodiversity dog will also have bite if we continue to conduct high quality science in the name of biodiversity research. Research of this kind is occurring in the Key Centre for Biodiversity and Bioresources at Macquarie University. It is also important...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1991
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1991.002
EISBN: 0-9599951-5-3
... sites, and for kinds of prey. Nest and foraging sites, nesting materials and prey may be associated with mature or overmature trees, but not exclusively with habitat trees. Ensuring that these resources are available requires modification of existing wildlife management programmes and needs to begin...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2019) 40 (1): 151–157.
Published: 01 January 2019
.... 2 The view that an animal, human or nonhuman, qualifies for inclusion within the scope of ethical theorizing in virtue of possessing a requisite degree of psychological capacity is known as moral individualism or the psychological theory of intrinsic value . A view of this kind is a basic...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (3): 433–437.
Published: 01 May 2020
...: But we still think it s potentially really good because pigs are really good at sniffing. PAUL WILLIS: But you could simultaneously raise your own bacon. What about other dog breeds then? ROMANE CRISTESCU: So, everyone has kind of got a different answer to that, so I ll give you mine first. I think every...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (3): 487–491.
Published: 01 May 2020
..., in New Zealand, there s a really active fungi community, so I think if you build the right platform, - and we can see that through the development of all smaller citizen science platforms - those people do find each other. PAUL WILLIS: That kind of work is going on, we do have slug watch out there, do we...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 39 (1): 81–84.
Published: 01 December 2017
..., an invitation, rather than a detailed thesis but it is precisely this kind of an opening, like mice gnawing into a sack of grain, that we take pests to be ideally suited to creating. As numerous scholars have described, agriculture has tended to be understood as a threshold activity in the 1 The Anthropocene...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2019) 40 (1): 218–229.
Published: 01 January 2019
.... Would you agree that that s the case, and is that justifiable? JOHN HADLEY: Well, I don t think it is but - - - PAUL WILLIS: What don t you think is justifiable? JOHN HADLEY: I think the strongest case for thinking about value behind Homo sapiens is based on some kind of concept of psychology...