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limestone

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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (2): 386–461.
Published: 20 May 2022
... (A), historical records for all priority species (B) and the extent and severity of fire impact based on FESM data. 388 AuZstoraolilaongist volume 42 (2) 2022 2019-2020 megafires: Immediate impacts on land snails in northern NSW Several isolated limestone outcrops with their associated vine thickets...
Includes: Supplementary data
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.084
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
... Woodland or limestone outcrops at Jenolan Caves. There is a number of species endemic to the Sydney region including the endangered Cumberland Plain Land Snail Meridolum corneovirens , which is only found in western Sydney. Most species have small ranges and can survive in small areas, therefore even...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 25 (2): 29–66.
Published: 17 March 2014
... Evolution Extinction Rainforest Freshwater Limestone Tertiary Oligocene Miocene Pliocene Pleistocene Holocene Correlation Stratigraphy Palaeoecology Anon., 1989a. Selected publications involving Riversleigh fossils and their significance. Riversleigh Notes 5: 3-6. Anon., 1989b...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 599–618.
Published: 20 October 2011
... tracks. Lowland floodplains are dominated by eucalypt savanna with a Triodia ground layer (Cummings et al. 1998). The centre of the park encloses two major geological units; in the south-eastern corner the park parts of the Carl Creek Limestone member which includes heavily eroded and dissected limestone...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (4): 554–560.
Published: 20 October 2011
... limestones. Wildlife Australia Magazine 42 (4): 40-41. A karst of thousands: land snails of the Chillagoe limestones Wildlife Australia Magazine 42 40 41 Stanisic, J. 2006. A karst of thousands: land snails of the Chillagoe limestones (part two). Wildlife Australia Magazine 43 (1): 36-37...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 26 (1): 1–6.
Published: 17 March 2014
... DWYER, P. D., 1965. Bat erosion in Australian limestone caves. Helictite 3: 85-90. Bat erosion in Australian limestone caves Helictite 3 85 90 DWYER, P. D. AND HARRIS, J. A., 1972. Behavioural acclimatization to temperature by pregnant Miniopterus (Chiroptera). Physiol. Zool. 45: 14-21...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (2): 257–260.
Published: 17 March 2014
... areas to the west in the Northern Territory (Barkly Tableland, Georgina Limestone sub-regions), have failed to record any S. douglasi (Fisher 2001). The landscapes in these areas support a more diverse vegetation and soil mosaic in comparison to those where existing S. douglasi records are derived...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (2): fmii–fmcdxcviii.
Published: 31 August 2022
... in northern NSW Several isolated limestone outcrops with their associated vine thickets are particularly relevant for many endemic priority species because these snails are tightly associated with this specific habitat type. Within this study area, we vetted previous occurrence records of priority species...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (1): 82–89.
Published: 04 October 2011
...-east of the Cape. Limestone cliffs of 50 m elevation comprise the coastline. Smooth outcrops of schist at the base of the cliffs are favoured as haul-out sites by sea lions and fur seals. At the Seal Slide there is a break in the cliffs with a sandy slope that extends from the beach to the cliff top...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (3): 458–467.
Published: 17 March 2014
... Resources: Indooroopilly, Queensland. Schulz, M. and Hogan, L., 1998b. Preliminary fauna assessment of proposed sale area, Limestone Logging Area, Koombooloomba State Forest. Forest Ecosystem Research and Assessment Technical Papers 99-2, Department of Natural Resources: Indooroopilly, Queensland...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (3): 287–298.
Published: 17 March 2014
..., P. M. A., 1993. Trilaphosuchus rackhami, gen. et sp. nov., a new crocodilian from the early Miocene Limestones of Riversleigh, northwestern Queensland. J. Vert. Paleo. 13: 90-98. Trilaphosuchus rackhami, gen. et sp. nov., a new crocodilian from the early Miocene Limestones of Riversleigh...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (3): 329.
Published: 17 March 2014
... South Wales 2480 The Little Bent-wing Bat Minioptem awlralu is regarded as a cave-dwelling species, roosting in caves, abandoned mines, tunnels, stormwater drains and occasionally buildings (Hall and Richards 1979; Dwyer 1968, 1983). The few documented maternity sites are normally situated in limestone...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2016) 38 (2): 183–191.
Published: 01 January 2016
... Bat numbers in these caves. As the region contains large expanses of exposed limestone, it was expected that other caves were likely to exist that could be used as roost sites by Ghost Bats. The region has few roads and finding new caves was only made possible through the use of helicopters...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 22 (2): 1–4.
Published: 17 March 2014
... of the author's mammal survey area. The lllawarra Ranges enclose a coastal plain which is heavily urbanised in parts but is rural elsewhere. Backing the forested ranges are the southern tablelands which are partly rural and partly forested. Not far outside the survey area is the limestone region at Bungonia where...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (2): 643–653.
Published: 31 August 2022
... landscape pockets were relatively less affected than the surrounding dry sclerophyll forests, which in turn provided greater micro-habitat refuge. Limestone outcrops are also critically important habitats and support a large number of narrowly distributed endemic species (Hyman and Stanisic 2005...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (4): 533–562.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... The second camp was made on Proper Bay, nine miles south of Port Lincoln. Here the scrub was also of two kinds - dwarf mallee and ti-tree. The land here was of limestone formation with but little soil, while the first camp was pitched in granite country with a fair amount of soil in the valleys. The poor...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 166–174.
Published: 17 March 2014
... be a further contributor to the rarity of M. w o p u s . Typical roosts occur in caves, mines or beneath bridges (Richards 1995). Caves and mines were absent and most bridges in the area may be unsuitable because they would experience regular flooding. It is interesting to note that limestone cliffs and caves...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (4): 529–532.
Published: 17 March 2014
... fellow selling $1 stickers to help stop limestone mining of the Barrier Reef. It was the first such direct action any of our class had seen. Even the dollar was a novel item, having displaced the pound only two years earlier. Grigg s environmental concerns The NSW State of the Environment 2000 report...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021) 42 (1): 146–155.
Published: 31 August 2021
... in Cape Range is likely a result of its isolated and unique habitat type (Kendrick 1993; Doughty et al. 2008). Cape Range is an area of deeply dissected limestone that rises to 315 m and is surrounded by a sharp transition from rock to sand dune (Storr and Hanlon 1980). This sharp transition between...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (3): 408–413.
Published: 01 June 2017
... competitive processes and described that B. lesueur s range expanded (the population was no longer restricted to the limestone areas of Boodie Island (Morris 2002) following exotic rodent eradications. Although in both cases the citation is correct, neither Towns and Atkinson (2006) nor Banks and Hughes...