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microchiroptera, management

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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (4): 564–569.
Published: 20 October 2011
... maternity roost of the Large-eared Pied Bat Chalinolobus dwyeri (Ryan) (Microchiroptera: Vespertilionidae) in central New South Wales Australia Michael Pennay New South Wales Department of Environment and Climate Change, PO Box 733 Queanbeyan NSW 2620. Email michael.pennay@environment.nsw.gov.au A B ST R A...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.008
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... The scientific merit of two opposing themes toward the conservation of Australian forest dwelling microchiroptera over the past four decades is reviewed. The initial theme throughout the 1960's and 1970's was of a vulnerable and threatened bat fauna - a contemporary view for which there is...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.038
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
...; therefore, bats (Microchiroptera) adapted to foraging along edges and in open spaces are likely to be less active in regrowth forest. Thinning is an integral component of regrowth management and could reduce structural clutter to a level suitable for bats with a range of clutter tolerances; yet little is...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.008
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... We have been struck by the paucity of coverage of bats in the media, even though they constitute a quarter of the Australian mammal fauna. The Microchiroptera are almost invisible to the public, but the Megachiroptera come to public attention mostly when camping in or near towns or in orchards...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (3): 369–376.
Published: 17 March 2014
..., R. (ed), 1995. The Mammals of Australia, Reed Books: Chatswood. The Mammals of Australia Tidemann, C. R. and Flavel, S. C., 1987. Factors affecting choice of diurnal roost site by tree-hole bats (Microchiroptera) in southeastern Australia. Aust. Wildl. Res. 14: 459-73. Factors affecting...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (4): 618–624.
Published: 17 March 2014
... . microchiroptera echolocation calls regional variation Chalinolobus gouldii Coakes, J. S. and Steed, L. G. 1996. SPSS for Windows. Analysis without anguish. John Wiley and Sons, Brisbane. Analysis without anguish Corben, C., 1996. Getting good calls from captured bats. The Australasian Bat...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 27 (1-2): 20–27.
Published: 17 March 2014
... least one genus (Anthops) and one other species of small insectivorous bat, microchiroptera, are endemic to the Solomon lslands geographic area, which includes Bougainville. This makes Solomon lslands mammal fauna one of the most diverse and endemic to be found on oceanic islands anywhere on earth...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 181–186.
Published: 17 March 2014
... are also sought as nesting and/or roosting sites by birds such as parmu, cockatoos and owls and mammals such as insectivorous bats (Microchiroptera), possums and gliders (Pyke 1990; Bird Observers Club of Australia Conservation Committee 1993; McDonald 1994; Trainor 1995; Paton 1996; New 1997 ). 182...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2012) 36 (1): 49–54.
Published: 07 September 2012
... Action Statements PAS species recovery Adams M, Reardon T.R., Baverstock P.R., Watts C.H.S. 1988. Electrophoretic resolution of species boundaries in Australian Microchiroptera. IV Molossidae (Chiroptera). Australian Journal of Biological Sciences 40: 417-33. Electrophoretic resolution of...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (4): 608–609.
Published: 17 March 2014
...Murray Ellis Adams, M., Reardon, T.R., Baverstock, P.R., and Watts, C.H.S. 1988. Electrophoretic resolution of species boundaries in the Australian Microchiroptera. IV. The Molossidae (Chiroptera). Australian Journal of Biological Science 41:315-326. Electrophoretic resolution of...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (1): 117–126.
Published: 02 June 2014
.... Strahan. Reed New Holland, Sydney, NSW. The Mammals of Australia 451 453 Pennay, M. 2008. A maternity roost of the large-eared pied bat Chalinolobus dwyeri (Ryan) (Microchiroptera: Vespertilionidae) in central New South Wales. Australia. Australian Zoologist 34: 564- 569. http://dx.doi.org...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (4): 392–397.
Published: 17 March 2014
... resolution of species boundaries in Australian microchiroptera. I. Eptesicus (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae), Aust. J. Biol. Sci. 40: 143-62. Electrophoretic resolution of species boundaries in Australian microchiroptera. I. Eptesicus (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) Aust. J. Biol. Sci. 40 143 62...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 29 (3-4): 245–249.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... Movements of banded bats (Microchiroptera: Vespertilionidae) in Mumbulla State Forest near Bega, New South Wales. Aust. Mammal. 11: 167-69. Movements of banded bats (Microchiroptera: Vespertilionidae) in Mumbulla State Forest near Bega, New South Wales Aust. Mammal. 11 167 69 Lunney, D. and...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 25 (3): 71–78.
Published: 17 March 2014
... bats, the microchiroptera, are small, and some are amazingly deli- cate flying-machines of a mere 5 grams, weighing less than a ten-cent coin. They are unfamiliar, most people never having seen one of these small bats. Some species of bats, both large and small, are numerous and wide- spread, but there...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (3): 462–476.
Published: 17 March 2014
... by tree hole bats Microchiroptera in southeastern Australia. Australian Wildlife Research 14: 459-473. Factors affecting choice of diurnal roost site by tree hole bats Microchiroptera in southeastern Australia Australian Wildlife Research 14 459 473 von Haartman, L. 1957. Adaptation in...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (4): 467–479.
Published: 17 March 2014
... Australia. Aust. Wildl. Res. 14: 459-73. Factors affecting choice of diurnal roost site by tree-hole bats (Microchiroptera) in south-eastern Australia Aust. Wildl. Res. 14 459 73 Traill, B. J., 1991. Box-Ironbark: tree hollows, wildlife management. Pp. 119-23 in Conservation of Australia's...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (3): 346–350.
Published: 17 March 2014
...), and Dwyer et ul. (1979) were not sampled in the present survey, including saltmarshes, mangroves and heath habitats. These areas may have extra bat species to those recorded in this study. The differences in occurrence by vegetation type for megachiroptera and microchiroptera (Table 1) were due mainly...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 166–174.
Published: 17 March 2014
... species boundaries in Australian Microchiroptera. IV The Molossidae (Chiroptera). Aust. J. Biol. Sci. 41: 315-26. Electrophoretic resolution of species boundaries in Australian Microchiroptera. IV The Molossidae (Chiroptera) Aust. J. Biol. Sci. 41 315 26 Bacon, P. E., Stone, C., Binns, D. L...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (3): 410–419.
Published: 17 March 2014
... Common Ringtail Possum 4 Tachyglossidae Tachyglossus aculeatus Echidna 9 Vombatidae Vombatus ursinus Common Wombat 1 Microchiroptera spp. unidentified bat spp. 2 Birds Anatidae Anas platyrynchos Mallard 1 Anas superciliosa Pacific Black Duck 1 Chenonetta jubata Wood Duck 1 Alaudidae Mirafra javanica...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (2): 298–315.
Published: 17 March 2014
... Chiroptera) but are quite distinct from the small, largely predatory bats (suborder Microchiroptera - little bats ) and are placed in a separate suborder Megachiroptera - big bats . It is thought that they may have evolved separately to the Microchiroptera, possibly from primates (Pettigrew, Jamieson...