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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 432–434.
Published: 14 October 2011
.... B. Saunders, Philadelphia. Herpetology Krefft (1873) published a description of a new crocodile from Australia which he named Crocodilus johnsoni. His paper, published in the Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, was communicated by J.E. Gray. The type material was not collected...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 24 (2): 116.
Published: 17 March 2014
...Ronald Strahan From Woolly to Red: A NOTE ON NAMES Gould's artistry and entrepreneurial flair tend to overshadow the fact that he was a remarkably good systematic zoologist with an 'eye for species', even in the field of mammalogy, to which he devoted only a small part of his time. L i e...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 21 (1): 1–26.
Published: 17 March 2014
... is confirmed as a valid, applicable name. Marilyna is characterised by a broad, heavily built body, eyes set below the dorsal profile, nasal organ with two openings, eye rim completely adnate, a large olfactory foramen in each prefrontal, and a deep caudal peduncle. Reicheltia n. gen. is proposed...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020)
Published: 28 December 2020
...Stephen M. Jackson; Peter J.S. Fleming; Mark D.B. Eldridge; Michael Archer; Sandy Ingleby; Rebecca N. Johnson; Kristofer M. Helgen ABSTRACT Taxonomy is the science of the classification of living things and comprises two main processes, defining taxa and naming them. In relation to the taxonomy...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 627–632.
Published: 01 December 2018
...Brian Heterick; Jonathan Majer ABSTRACT Taxonomic stability is essential if the requirements of a host of stakeholders - health professionals, farmers, environmental consultants and public servants, to name just a few occupations – who need advice on particular organisms are to be satisfied...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1999
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1999.026
EISBN: 0-9586085-1-2
... Recognizing and naming species underpins assessment of species richness, patterns of diversity, distribution and endemism, and most of the templates used to define invertebrate assemblages and help set priorities for conservation. Formal names facilitate information retrieval, and also influence...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 22 (3): 10–12.
Published: 17 March 2014
... of Derby of a letter from Gilbert to Gould dated 8 June 1844, written from the Darling Downs (then part of New South Wales but now in Queensland). The letter mainly consists of the description of a new parrot discovered by Gilbert in the Darling Downs, which he hoped might be named after him; a commentary...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020)
Published: 16 October 2020
..., inland lakes. They guided people safely across hundreds of kilometers of desert, locating the places where water sources reach up closest to the earth’s surface from the underground lakes and waterways that flow beneath the continent. The dingo’s status in Aboriginal culture is celebrated in the naming...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (2): 143–178.
Published: 30 September 2020
... into the species, hence the need for a reliable reference. This paper provides a summary of the work involved in developing the catalogue, together with a synopsis of the findings. The catalogue has been named the Thylacine Image Registry [TIR], and is published here for the first time. Thylacine Thylacinus...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1993.007
EISBN: 0-9599951-8-8
... Western Australia has a rich and diverse reptile fauna of 519 named species as well as 78 named species of frogs: both groups include many endemics. The Western Australian Wildlife Conservation Act 1950, which is administered by the Department of Conservation and Land Management, protects all...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 617–626.
Published: 01 December 2018
...Jonathan Majer; Brian Heterick ABSTRACT Continuity of employment can be a great asset when carrying out long-term studies. This paper describes three investigations that have benefited from a researcher's ability to continue monitoring over extended periods, namely: impact of fire; changes...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (2): 352–358.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Jennifer R. Anson ABSTRACT Australian mammals have been subject to a range of threats that have contributed to species declines and extinctions since European settlement. Invasive predators, namely the European Red Fox Vulpes vulpes and the feral Cat Felis catus , are particularly detrimental...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 39 (1): 103–113.
Published: 01 December 2017
..., or the animals displaced by invaders. Wasteful practices give conservation a bad name. Better ‘metaphors for environmental sustainability’ (Larson, 2011) can lead to better outcomes for the environment and for those who care for it. The task of conservation demands more than science: it is rewarding for many...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (1): 69–75.
Published: 17 March 2014
... smaller than any of the other flying-foxes currently known from Australia. The common name “Torresian Flying-fox” is proposed for P. banakrisi . flying-fox Pteropus banakrisi Torresian Flying-fox flying-fox systemetics Chiroptera systematics Andersen, K., 1912.Catalogue...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (2): 158–169.
Published: 17 March 2014
... of the Australian Capital Territory and New South Wales. Ail three taxa from the Southern Tablelands are distinguishable by dierences in both morphology and advertisement call. The nomenclature of the population variably known as L. castanea or L. flavipunctata was determined and the former name is recommended...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 29 (1-2): 49–61.
Published: 17 March 2014
... A. Adams, 1854, Astelena scitula (A. Adams, 1855), Ethminolia probabilis lredale, 1924, Talopena gloriola iredale, 1929, Monilea callifera (Lamarck, 1822), Bankivia fasciata (Menke, 1830) and Leiopyrga lineolaris (Gould, 1861). The use of the name Odontotrochus indistinctus for the species formerly...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.034
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-8-1
..., which is serious enough, but cast the whole discipline of science, and those who work in the area, namely scientists, as being unreliable, even vicious and irrational. This puts science under siege and raises ethical issues for journalists of distorting the truth, getting the facts wrong, and being...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.053
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-8-1
..., and intimidating people involved. To be effective in countering attacks, it is valuable to challenge each of these methods, namely by exposing actions, validating targets, interpreting actions as unfair, mobilising support and not relying on official channels, and standing up to intimidation. On a wider scale...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (1): 39–81.
Published: 04 October 2011
... to relate the name to a singular, currently recognised species. This review required a consideration of two taxa not usually associated with timoriensis: bifax Thomas, 1915 from eastern Australia and New Guinea, and daedalus Thomas, 1915, previously treated as the western subspecies of bifax , occurring...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2010
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2010.006
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-3-6
... named after Darwin: a Leaf beetle Idiocephala darwini ; a Seed bug Ontiscus darwini ; a Gasteruptiid wasp Foenus darwinii ; and a Bee Halictus darwiniellus . The remaining novel insects comprise six Leaf beetles (Chrysomelidae), four Stink bugs (Pentatomidae), a Seed bug (Lygaeidae), an Assassin bug...