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orchard

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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 698–710.
Published: 20 October 2011
...Anja Divljan; Kerryn Parry-Jones; Peggy Eby For several years, animal welfare concerns have been raised over the practice of shooting Grey-headed Flying-foxes (GHFF) in commercial fruit orchards in Australia, and the role of government agencies in licensing the kill. In NSW the practice is poorly...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.039
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.041
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... flowering of eucalypts. When there is broad-scale failure of native foods in spring, flying-foxes raid orchards for ripening exotic fruit. These events are compounded by spring births in flying-foxes and potentially greater mortality from shooting in orchards. Dual benefits to flying-foxes and orchardists...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.035
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... Exclusion netting systems are the only humane method for preventing flying-fox damage to orchards, especially during seasons when natural food is in short supply. As the forests that provide natural food are eliminated, and flying-fox pressure on orchards therefore increases, the need...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.033
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.037
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.042
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... Many fruit growers see flying-foxes such as the Grey-headed Flying-fox as a threat to their livelihood. Understandably, when large numbers of the animals suddenly enter orchards and cause significant damage, growers start to talk of “population explosions” of the animals. In this paper we...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2019) 40 (1): 102–117.
Published: 01 January 2019
... kangaroos by clearing a senescent orchard for further development, was resolved by using a community group to relocate at least 300 kangaroos to a location some 100 km to the east. At the time of the relocation this location was in drought and disoriented kangaroos were killed on the road. No information...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2015) 37 (4): 461–471.
Published: 01 September 2015
... orchards and damage to garden plants. Impacts should be further investigated to justify management directions. Eradication in Australia may be achievable due to populations being mostly restricted to settled areas. © 2015 Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales 2015 aviary escapes cage-bird...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.043
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... on identifying potential solutions. This paper outlines the activities, outcomes and future strategies of the Committee in its search to find solutions for management of flying-foxes in orchard production systems. ...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (1): 76–100.
Published: 17 March 2014
... the most ideal conditions.The implications of our models are discussed in reference to the long-term management and conservation needs of Australian flying foxes. We conclude that current death-rates of flying-foxes in NSW and Queensland fruit orchards are putting state populations at serious risk...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 38–54.
Published: 17 March 2014
... be the development of non-lethal deterrence at orchards followed by the development of methods for countering tick paralysis. Further annual censuses will be necessary to monitor population trends in comparison with me current baseline. This initial census was conducted as part of an integrated approach...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.040
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... species is unique in that it is also recognised as a horticultural pest, predominantly in coastal orchards of south-eastern Australia. In times of native resource (pollen, nectar and rainforest fruits) shortage, flying-foxes are known to utilise commercial fruit crops. As such, the species is affected...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.008
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... We have been struck by the paucity of coverage of bats in the media, even though they constitute a quarter of the Australian mammal fauna. The Microchiroptera are almost invisible to the public, but the Megachiroptera come to public attention mostly when camping in or near towns or in orchards...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2007.019
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-1-2
... of pasture and dams. There is little evidence to support claims of pollution or the need to control numbers but this message falls on deaf ears. Grey-headed Flying-foxes Pteropus poliocephalus are locally abundant yet Nationally threatened and cause significant damage in orchards, creating management...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.032
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... Flying-foxes come into conflict with fruit growers when they raid fruit crops in response to limited native food resources. A standard technique used by fruit growers to deter flying-foxes has been to shoot the animals as they enter the orchard. This activity has been regulated by National Parks...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.036
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... committee to address management problems; 2) incentives are required to encourage/assist growers to net their orchards; 3) governments must make a serious commitment to an integrated and properly-funded research effort; 4) shooting under licence should continue until effective non-lethal alternatives...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.045
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... in perpetuity - and cost-effective and environmentally and socially acceptable ways of minimising conflicts with people in rural and urban contexts. Exclusion netting can achieve this in some, although not all, orchard situations but is usually inappropriate for managing camp occupation. There is a need...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.048
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... on the licences it issues to cull flying-foxes in orchards. The licences covered a wide range of crops, and the area of crops covered under individual licences ranged from 0.5 hectares to 53 hectares. The total licensed kill for a two-month period in 1998 was 255 Little Red Flying-foxes and 1330 Grey-headed...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.050
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... flying-foxes on domestic fruit trees than on either native or orchard trees. Even though it was well known that orchardists had a problem with flying-foxes, it was not anticipated that domestic growers had a problem as well. Thus management of flying-foxes must consider their impact on domestically grown...