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phenotypic plasticity

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Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.017
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
..., to bring breeding back into line with prevailing conditions. These are non-genomic factors: they influence the expression of genes, and therefore phenotype, without altering the DNA. Stages of reproduction relate temporally with the endogenous rhythm, but individual flying-foxes may need to make fine...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 36 (4): 424–428.
Published: 28 January 2014
... plasticity in one phase may influence fitness in a subsequent phase, in complex and non-intuitive ways. Bufonidae competition Limnodynastidae metamorphosis phenotypic plasticity Bufo marinus tadpole Alford, R.A. 1989. Variation in predator phenology affects predator performance...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (4): 610–617.
Published: 17 March 2014
... of the family Elapidae, with notes on related genera Journal of Zoology, London 151 497 543 Madsen, T. and Shine, R., 1993. Phenotypic plasticity in body sizes and sexual size dimorphism in European grass snakes. Evolution 47: 321-325. Phenotypic plasticity in body sizes and sexual size dimorphism...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (3): 401–405.
Published: 17 March 2014
... during cooler months. Variation in growth was not a seasonal adaptation to enhance pre-metamorphic survival. However, it is probable that variability was a response to local climatic factors experienced during vitellogenesis and/ or tadpole phenotypic plasticity. Since variation was greater within...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021)
Published: 29 October 2021
... populations of tiger Organochlorine Pesticides and Polycyclic Aromatic snakes, Notechis scutatus occidentalis: the influence of Hydrocarbons in Wetlands Along an Urban Gradient, and phenotypic plasticity on various life history traits. Unpublished the Use of a High Trophic Snake as a Bioindicator. Archives...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 189–197.
Published: 14 October 2011
... 11, 429-36. Energetic dynamics and anuran breeding phenology: insights from a dynamic game Behavioural Ecology 11 429 36 Merila J., Laurila A. & Lindgren B. 2004. Variation in the degree and costs of adaptive phenotypic plasticity among Rana temporaria populations. Journal...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 229–234.
Published: 14 October 2011
... P50) (Fig. 6A) mediated by reduced ATP:haemoglobin ratios (Fig. 6B), appeared to protect oxygen loading in the gills (Wells et al. 1989). We concluded that such adjustments might be a general response to hypoxia reflecting a phenotypic plasticity, rather than a specific adaptation to episodically low...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (2): 178–187.
Published: 27 August 2014
...Alan Midgley; Shelley Burgin; Adrian Renshaw While presence/absence of endocrine disruption has been widely observed within polluted wetlands, relatively few data have addressed population level changes for any species. This paper investigated the effects of endocrine disruption on the phenotypic...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 28 (1-4): 28–36.
Published: 17 March 2014
... elements of ecological complexity which comprise the full range of biological diversity (Walker 1992). Other phenomena to be considered include phenotypic plasticity; genetic variability within a popula- tion; ecotypic variation; functional diversity; community diversity; and landscape diversity (Walker...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2019) 40 (1): 92–101.
Published: 01 January 2019
... the 1700s that our modern taxonomic system was developed by Carl Linnaeus, who considered that species were unchangeable entities created by God (Wilkins 2009). Since then, recognition of the plasticity of species led to evolutionary theory, and some have suggested that Charles Darwin himself considered...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 341–348.
Published: 14 October 2011
... it is possible that certain species may have little scope or lack phenotypic plasticity, particularly if there is little natural variation in activity. Alternatively, as has been seen in other skeletally mature mammals, it may be that the scope for a periosteal appositional response to increased bone strains...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 39 (1): 85–102.
Published: 01 December 2017
... and domesticate [that] is distinguished from related but ultimately different processes of management and agriculture (Zeder 2015: 3191). Zeder identifies the key research questions for domestication science as understanding the range of genotypic, phenotypic, plastic, and contextual impacts that can be used...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021) 41 (3): fmi–660.
Published: 28 October 2021
... accepted species within the together suggest that dingoes and domestic dogs are genus Canis). Under other frameworks, however, such recognisably separate, and that the dingo phenotype as the phylogenetic and cohesion species concepts, whether pure or hybrid has selective advantages for less focus...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (4): 696–730.
Published: 04 December 2020
... is an extremely complex, highly virulent secondary zoospores, seek out and encyst on the surface pathogen with great phenotypic and physiological of a host fish. After germinating, S. parasitica hyphae plasticity and predominantly asexual reproduction grow through the dermal and epidermal tissues of the (Diéguez...
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/9780980327250
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-6-7
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021) 41 (4): fmi–fmcliii.
Published: 07 December 2021
... and encyst on the surface pathogen with great phenotypic and physiological of a host fish. After germinating, S. parasitica hyphae plasticity and predominantly asexual reproduction grow through the dermal and epidermal tissues of the (Diéguez-Uribeondo et al. 2007). The species is wholly fish, seeking...
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/9780980327243
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.7882/9780958608565
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-6-5
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.028
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-8-1
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/9780958608534
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-3-4