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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 230–239.
Published: 17 March 2014
...Graham Pyke; Arthur White Populations of five frog species were monitored at three ponds utilized by the endangered Green and Golden Bell Frog Litoria aurea over a three year period 1993-1996. Litoria aurea bred at the two semi-permanent ponds with fluctuating water levels but did not breed...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 21 (1): 75–84.
Published: 17 March 2014
...Greg Maguire; J.D. Bell A diverse fish fauna (49 species) was recorded in four tidal 0.11 ha prawn farming ponds which appear to act as fish traps. The potential deleterious effects of twelve of these species on prawn growth or survival are discussed in terms of the diet and reproductive biology...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 28 (1-4): 47–51.
Published: 17 March 2014
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2007.037
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-0-5
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2007.039
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-0-5
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.011
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2003.011
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-6-5
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1999
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1999.041
EISBN: 0-9586085-1-2
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1999
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1999.048
EISBN: 0-9586085-1-2
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1999
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1999.073
EISBN: 0-9586085-1-2
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021) 42 (3): 667–689.
Published: 22 October 2021
.... For aquatic-breeding frogs, pond physical/chemical properties influence all life-stages and therefore populations, species, and communities. However, studies have focussed on tadpoles, considered few water variables, and not considered relationships between water attributes and frog populations or communities...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (3): 285–290.
Published: 14 October 2011
... contains 22 habitat ponds, each attached to a water reticulation system. Predation by Gambusia has been identified as a key threatening process for the Green and Golden Bell Frog and may be a major contributor to the disappearance of many frog species in Australia. Its presence in Narawang Wetland offered...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (2): 141–165.
Published: 17 March 2014
...L. C. Llewellyn G. rostratus the Murray Jollytail bred in earthen ponds at the Inland Fisheries Research Station, Narrandera, NSW, when surface and bottom water temperatures were above 10.5oC during August and September. Flooding was unnecessary but there was water flow through the pond. Eggs were...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (1): 12–31.
Published: 17 March 2014
...), shallow (i.e., <1 m) ponds that are either ephemeral or fluctuate significantly in water level, are free of Gambusia and other predatory fish, and have emergent aquatic vegetation. Its breeding habitat also usually has potential shelter provided by nearby rocks or thick, low vegetation. Yet L. aurea...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 698–712.
Published: 01 December 2018
... in the area close to the two survey sites between 1981 and 1983 and frog surveys were undertaken there between 1978 and 2016. One site was a dunal pond that supported up to 13 frog species, the other a wallum swamp that supported up to 12 frog species; however, frog community composition fluctuated...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1993.039
EISBN: 0-9599951-8-8
... ponds, three streams, one site with both ponds and a stream, and several ephemeral situations. Fifteen myobatrachid and 15 hylid species occur in the area. During the period of the study five species have disappeared — three myobatrachids and two hylids. These are two species of Great Barred River frog...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (4): 480–510.
Published: 17 March 2014
... in the 1960s using fish from the western population. M. adspersa bred in ponds and aquaria at temperatures between 20.0 and 29.9oC (34.0oC at water surface), and in ponds between December and February. An abundant food supply was essential but rising water levels were not required. The elaborate spawning...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (1): 49–59.
Published: 17 March 2014
... success in ephemeral ponds forming away from the lagoon, though there is a risk that these ponds may not persist for tadpoles to complete development. Frogs in this northern population were predominantly brown in colour, suggesting some morphological and genetic differentiation from southern populations...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (3): 361–372.
Published: 14 October 2011
... spring or summer and should target ponds that are warm and fish-free. Program success was also limited by the numbers of tadpoles available for release. The lack of tadpoles for spring/summer release since the 2003/2004 breeding season has prevented evaluation of new, relatively warm ponds. Any captive...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (3): 387–392.
Published: 14 October 2011
... conducted 2.5 years later surveyed 46 people who indicated continued interest in bell frogs from the first questionnaire. This revealed that 17 people had modified their gardens to be more attractive to frogs and 7 people had installed frog ponds. Eleven respondents had seen the frog in the four months...