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rodent

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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 724–732.
Published: 01 December 2018
..., with the dominant species changing from peak to peak. The deer mouse ( Peromyscus maniculatus ) fluctuated irregularly, completely disappearing from the catch for 5 years in the early 1990s. Weasels were rare for the first 25 years of small rodent changes and marten were absent, but since 2000 marten have colonized...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (2): 234–237.
Published: 28 October 2014
...Peter McDonald; Chris Pavey Populations of Australian desert rodents are known to undergo booms in response to resource pulses following periods of high rainfall. Australia's arid-adapted Tyto owls have been recorded responding functionally and numerically to these small mammal booms, though...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (1): 39–42.
Published: 17 March 2014
...Murray Ellis Four large rodent species (Greater Stick-nest Rat Leporillus conditor , Long-tailed Hopping-mouse Notomys longicaudatus . Plains Rat Pseudomys australis and Long-haired Rat Rattus villosissimus ) have been identified among the subfossil remains collected at Mootwingee National Park...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 0001
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1990.018
EISBN: 0-949324-29-9
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2019) 40 (1): 75–91.
Published: 01 January 2019
... to the perceived risk it poses to endemic land birds and breeding seabirds. However, its main diet there comprises Rattus rattus and House Mice Mus musculus and because it is proposed to eradicate these rodents from the island in 2019, the owls are also scheduled for removal then due to the likelihood...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (2): 258–264.
Published: 17 March 2014
... from sea level to over 1000 m, and annual rainfall from 600-1800 mm, but are unified by a dense ground cover and waterlogging red or white sandy clays. Some potential threats to these rodent's populations are postulated including loss of ground cover and clearing of habitat in coastal regions. Despite...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 29 (3-4): 158–165.
Published: 17 March 2014
... the borders of New South Wales while eight species are entirely extinct. Most losses (21 species) occurred before 1900, particularly in the arid western region of the State. Overall, State-level extinctions represent 39.3 per cent of native rodents (11 of 28 species), 27.0 per cent of marsupials (17 of 63...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 204–215.
Published: 14 October 2011
... native mammals) employ periods of daily torpor or prolonged multi-day torpor (hibernation) to conserve energy. Daily torpor is used by dasyurids (e.g. dunnarts, antechinus, quolls), myrmecobiids (numbat), tarsipedids (honey-possum), petaurid possums (e.g. sugar glider), rodents (but only known...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022)
Published: 28 October 2022
...Steven L. Stephenson; Todd F. Elliott; Kelsey Elliott; Karl Vernes ABSTRACT Little is known about species of myxomycetes associated with vertebrate dung in Australia. In the present study, dung samples of 15 species of mammals (eight marsupials, three native rodents and four domestic or feral...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (4): 565–574.
Published: 01 June 2020
... and other disturbance events at which time the pair and their offspring were observed to exploit disturbed habitat and newly created forest edges in search of prey. Breeding activity was supported by an increased dietary focus on introduced rodents and other mammals displaced during habitat clearing...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1994.008
EISBN: 0-9599951-9-6
... on the western plains (27 species lost, representing 38 per cent of the original fauna) than on the coastal strip or in the Great Dividing Range (losses 4–15%). Losses in the west are due entirely to the catastrophic demise of marsupials (16 of the original 37 species lost) and rodents (11 of 17 species lost...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (1): 15–22.
Published: 02 June 2014
...David Paull; David Milledge; Phil Spark; Sally Townley; Kevin Taylor Habitats where rodents breed and congregate provide key refuge and foraging resources and as such may be important for the survival of local populations. The habitat characteristics at spring-time breeding and congregation sites...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (1): 100–107.
Published: 17 March 2014
...Kristy Graham; Grant Blackwell; Dieter Hochuli The Hastings River mouse Pseudomys oralis is a rare Australian rodent with a patchy distribution in north-east NSW and southern Queensland. The micro-habitat requirements of the species are poorly known, although the majority of known records...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (2): 188–193.
Published: 17 March 2014
... the Torrington area, in the western part of the New South Wales New England Tablelands bioregion, is documented. The specimen record comprised an intact fresh skull and was distinguished from other rodent species on the basis of dental and cranial characters. This record is significant as one of the first modern...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (3): 421–431.
Published: 17 March 2014
... survey protocol (using pitfall traps, Elliott traps and nocturnal and diurnal active searches). The proportion of records of snakes, pygopodids, frogs, two dragon species, the gecko Diplodactylus ciliaris and the rodent Pseudomys delicatulus was markedly greater in the pipeline than in the quadrat-based...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 25 (2): 29–66.
Published: 17 March 2014
... correlate Riversleigh's local faunas with others from central and eastern Australia; bats correlate them with faunal assemblages in Europe; rodents correlate them with Pliocene assemblages in eastern Australia. Monotremata Marsupialia Chiroptera Muridae Pisces Amphibia Reptilia Aves...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 27 (3-4): 66–91.
Published: 17 March 2014
... caused the local extinction of one native rodent and its niche appears to have been partly filled by two other native species. No associations were found between plant structural and floristic diversity and vertebrate diversity at survey sites and results probably reflected the availability of food...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (4): 533–562.
Published: 17 March 2014
... of decline of mammals, distinguishing animals in the size category of the larger native rodents (the first to decline) and those the size of small wallabies (a subsequent decline). His fieldwork indicated an approximate synchrony in decline of medium-sized mammals at two distant locations (Eyre Peninsula...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2004) 32 (4): 605–628.
Published: 01 December 2004
... in a reexamination of the temporal and spatial patterns of decline of these mammals. Shortridge collected a monotreme, 25 species of marsupial, 10 species of bat, 8 species of rodent, as well as rabbits and dingoes (a total of 46 species). He collected in five broad regions: mesic woodland sites in what is now...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.042
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... describe the seasonality, longevity and low reproductive potential of flying-foxes, and show that rapid expansion of their populations, at rates comparable to those of small rodents, simply is not possible. Sudden incursions of large numbers of flying-foxes into orchards reflect migration of animals...