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seed dispersal

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Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1993.012
EISBN: 0-9599951-8-8
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1991
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1991.008
EISBN: 0-9599951-5-3
... Forest managers have neglected the vital role of fruit-eating and blossom-feeding vertebrates as pollinators and seed dispersers in forest tree reproduction. Grey-headed Flying Foxes are obligate frugivores and nectarivores of eastern Australian forests. This study demonstrates their importance...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.041
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... Fruit-eating birds disperse many rainforest seeds, thereby influencing rainforest regeneration. The abundance of these birds may change following forest clearing, causing differences in seed dispersal between extensively-forested and fragmented areas. We assessed the responses of 26 frugivorous...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1991
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1991.007
EISBN: 0-9599951-5-3
... and ensure their long-term survival. A “raiders versus residents” model of seed dispersal, shown in Spectacled Flying Foxes Pteropus conspicillatus , is important in increasing the success of seedling survival because the residents force the raiders to leave their territories which causes seeds...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 38–54.
Published: 17 March 2014
... of the species in Australia is discussed. The imperative for conservation management of the Spectacled Flying Fox is emphasized regardless of its official conservation status, particularly in relation to seed dispersal and pollination of rainforest plants. The most important component of this management must...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 25 (3): 71–78.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... Priorities in ecological studies were considered to be habit selection and roost selection, followed by studies of movements and diets. Respondents agreed that there was a value of bat research to broader conservation issues: rainforest plant species benefit from seed dispersal by fruit bats; surveys of bats...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (1990) 26 (2): 44–46.
Published: 01 June 1990
... that rainforest trees "need" their seeds to be taken away from the parent to enhance survival, apparently by reducing competition for light and other resources. The Spectacled flying fox contributes to this by removing seeds over rela- tively long distances, partly by excreting small seeds as other dispersers do...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (3): 310–315.
Published: 17 March 2014
... Research Bulletin 53 1 81 Ratcliffe, F. N., 1948. Flying fox and drifting sand. Angus and Robertson, Sydney. Flying fox and drifting sand Richards, G. C., 1990. The Spectacled Flying-fox, Pteropus conspicillatus, (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae) in north Queensland. 2. Diet, seed dispersal...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 124–138.
Published: 01 October 2020
... Shire Eby, P. 1990. Seed dispersal and seasonal movements by Grey- Council. Eco Logical Australia, Sutherland, NSW. headed Flying-foxes and the implications for management. Pp. 28-32 in Flying-fox Workshop Proceedings, edited by J.M. Slack. Eco Logical Australia. 2016b. Batemans Bay Flying-fox Camp NSW...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 28 (1-4): 23–27.
Published: 17 March 2014
... Use. AGPS: Canberra. COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA, 1992. A ncw focw fm Awtmlio'r fwatr. Draft national forest policy sratement. AGPS, July 1992. EBY, P., 1991. Finger-winged night workers: managing forests to conserve the role of Grey-headed Flying Foxes as pollinators and seed dispersers. Pp. 91-100...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 29 (1-2): 1–2.
Published: 17 March 2014
... - Forest Use. AGPS; Canberra. COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA, 1992. A new focus for Australia's forests. Draft national forest policy statement. AGPS, July 1992. EBY, P., 1991. Finger-winged night workers: managing forests to conserve the role of Grey-headed Flying Foxes as pollinators and seed...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (2): 203–208.
Published: 10 October 2011
...Karl Vernes; James Trappe The diet of the Red-legged Pademelon Thylogale stigmatica has previously been described as comprising a range of dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plants, rainforest fruits, seeds, and some fungi. We collected T. stigmatica faecal samples from a rainforest-open forest...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.040
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... The Grey-headed Flying-fox, Pteropus poliocephalus , is listed as a threatened species in NSW, Victoria and nationally. The Grey-headed Flying-fox is a key species in maintaining forest ecosystems through the pollination of native trees and the dispersal of rainforest seeds. This threatened...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.060
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... of the value of the species, including its crucial role in dispersing seeds and pollen for forest regeneration. Community education and participation will be essential to the recovery process for the species. Further, the information currently available to management is inadequate for the task, and ongoing...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (1990) 26 (2): 46–47.
Published: 01 June 1990
... patterns. Aust. Mammal. 12 (in press). RICHARDS, G. C., 1990b. The Spectacled flying fox, Pteropus con- spicillatus (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae), in north Queensland. 2. Diet, seed dispersal and feeding ecology. Aust. Mammal. 12: (in press). STRAHAN, R. (Ed), 1983. The Australian Museum Complete Book...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 26 (3-4): 130–141.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... Cassowary protection — what community concern can do Ecotone 8 16 17 STEER, G. 1987. Tunnel of love. Aust. Geographic 5: 21-22. Tunnel of love Aust. Geographic 5 21 22 STOCKER, G. C. AND IRVINE, A. K., 1983. Seed dispersal by Cassowaries (Casuarius casuarius) in North Queensland's...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 29 (3-4): 177–212.
Published: 17 March 2014
...) on the northern slopes of the Hohe Tauern Mts Acta zoologica cracoviensis 35 509 64 Eby, P., 1991. “Finger-winged night workers”: managing forests to conserve the role of Grey-headed Flying Faxes as pollinators and seed dispersers. Pp. 91-100 in Conservation of Australia's forest fauna. ed by D. Lunney...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (1990) 26 (2): 42–43.
Published: 01 June 1990
... pollination and seed dispersal roles of flying-foxes in forest ecology the public can accept that fhese bats deserve a place in the world. "Friends of Bats" newsletter It is essential that the general public has access to scientific information on which bat conservation is based. The "Friends of Bats...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (3): 420–430.
Published: 17 March 2014
... 1086 Herrera, C.M. 1995. Plant-vertebrate seed dispersal systems in the Mediterranean - ecological, evolutionary, and historical determinants. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 26: 705-727. Plant-vertebrate seed dispersal systems in the Mediterranean - ecological, evolutionary...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (4): 515–528.
Published: 01 June 2020
... (Mickleburgh et al. 1992). In these ecosystems, flying-foxes are vital pollen vectors and seed dispersers (e.g. Marshall 1983; Richards 1995; Eby 1996; Banack 1998; Smith and Leslie 2006). It is well documented that pteropodids feed on a wide variety of plant parts, including pollen and nectar, fruit, shoots...